AP US Go Test 2 - m 2 TAKE-HOME 2 We Form Number 1 1....

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Unformatted text preview: m 2 TAKE-HOME 2 We Form Number 1 1. Equality was the goal of [A] the French Revolution. [B] the French, American and Russian Revolutions. [C] neither the French nor the American Revolution. [D] both the French and the American Revolutions. [E] the American Revolution. 2. The colonists fought to protect liberties which they believed were [A] essential to human progress. [B] ordained by God. [C] discoverable in nature and history. [D] based on “higher law.” [B] All of theSe. 3. Which of the following was not among the ideas that underlay the American Revolution? [A] the priority of human liberty over government [B] the tendency of human nature toward ambition [C] the importance of tradition [D] the necessity of a written constitution [E] legislative supremacy over the executive branch 4. The primacy of a written charter of government [A] is universally accepted today. [B] was insisted upon first by Americans. [C] had long been recognized in Anglo-Saxon history. [D] became common in the later eighteenth century. [B] All of these. 5. Under the Articles of Confederation, delegates to the national legislature were [A] selected by state governors. [B] elected by the people. [C] appointed by state committees. [D] chosen by the state legislatures. I Ch 2, Take-Home (The Constitution) AP AG [E] None of these. I I 6. Under the Articles of Confederation, the national government could [A] establish a national judicial system. [B] run the Post Office. [C] regulate commerce. [D] levy taxes. [E] None ol‘these. ! 7. Compared to the Pennsylvania state constitution of 1776, the constitution adopted by Massachusetts in 1780 was [A] more democratic, with power given to a one-house legislature, the members of which were elected to one-year terms. [B] less democratic, with a clear separation of powers among the various branches of government. [C] more democratic, with power residing largely in the hands of the courts. [D] less democratic, with power residing largely in the hands of a strong executive council. [E] more democratic, with power residing largely in the hands of the people through town meetings. 8. The effect of Shays’s Rebellion on attendance by delegates at the planned Constitutional Convention of 1787 was to [A] encourage attendance by delegates fearing intervention by the British. [B] discourage attendance by delegates fearing intervention by the British. [C] discourage attendance by delegates who fought in the Revolutionary War. [D] encourage attendance by delegates fearing the collapse of state governments. [E] discourage attendance by delegates fearing a public outcry against any strengthening of the Articles of Confederation. 9. Locke’s notion of the “state of nature” might best be exemplified today by [A] capitalistic venture in Eastern Europe. [B] the Clinton administration’s policy on national lands. [C] experimentation with human embryos. [D] the famine in Ethiopia. [E] international relations between non-allied powers. 10. Under the Virginia Plan, acts of the national legislature could have been revised by [A] the president. [B] a council of revision. [C] no one — they would have been supreme. [D] any federal court. [E] the Supreme Court. I\J ll. l2. l3. 14. The Virginia Plan would have granted the national legislature the power to veto state laws [A] only in elections years. [B] after consulting with the state in question. [C] when national prerogatives were infringed. [D] rarely or never. [E] any time it chose. A majority of the thirteen states eligible to vote for the compromise plan submitted to the Constitutional Convention on July 5, 1787, [A] voted for the compromise. [B] voted to table the compromise. [C] rejected the compromise in favor of the Virginia Plan. [D] were either absent or did not vote for the compromise. [E] rejected the compromise in favor of the New Jersey Plan. The importance of the Great Compromise adopted by the ConstitutiOnal Convention on July 16, 1789, was that it [A] strengthened the power of larger states at the expense of smaller states. [B] created a legislature similar in structure to that under the Articles of Confederation. [C] ensured support for a strong national government from small as well as large states. [D] established a single, one state — one vote formula under which all states would benefit. [E] granted equal power to the three branches of the new central government. The goal of the Framers of the U.S. Constitution was to create a [A] an autonomous collective. [B] pluralist democracy ruled by a political elite. [C] republic based on a system of representation. [D] pure democracy modeled after the New England town meeting. [E] political system in which majority rule was supreme. 15. The power of the people — pOpular majority rule — was limited by the US. Constitution in 16. 17. 18. several ways, including [A] establishing a directly elected House of Representatives. [B] concentrating political power in a single, supreme legislature. [C] granting law-making powers to the judicial branch of government. [D] removing all formal titles from the heads of government. making the amending of the US. Constitution relatively difficult. Relative to the notion of democratic government, the Supreme Court’s power of judicial review [A] places limits on democracy. [B] is used frequently. [C] is limited to state issues. [D] generally favors the executive. [E] is sometimes democratic, sometimes not. According to the text it was “not clear” whether the Framers intended that [A] members of the House be popularly elected. [B] there bejudicial review. [C] there be an electoral college. [D] there be a federal system. [B] members of the Senate be chosen by the state legislatures. Separation of power and federalism were two key principles in the framing of the US. Constitution. These two principles are related in that each [A] grants power to a political elite that acts on behalf of the people. [B] involves a system of checks and balances in which power is dispersed. [C] implies that it is sometimes necessary to exercise unrestrained power. [D] requires a strong central government elected by a popular majority. [E] reflects a need for “political virtue” — frugality, industry, temperance, and simplicity. 19. An amendment can be proposed by [A] a two—thirds vote of both houses of Congress [B] a two—thirds vote by the Senate only [C] either a two-thirds vote of both houses of Congress or a national convention called by Congress at the request of two-thirds of the states [D] a national convention called by Congress at the request of two-thirds of the states [E] None of these. 20. Which of the following is NOT a way in which Congress can check the federal courts? [A] refusing to approve a person nominated to be a judge (Senate only) [B] overturning a court decision with a two—thirds vote in the Senate [C] changing the number of the lower courts [D] using the impeachment powers to remove ajudge from office [E] changing the jurisdiction of the lower federal courts 21. Madison’s confidence in the usefulness of separation of powers rested on the assumption that [A] government would create virtuous citizens. [B] ambition would counteract each other. [C] no one would purposely seek power. [D] human nature was basically good. [E] the strongest would survive. 22. The text suggests that perhaps “the most democratic feature of the Constitution” was [A] the provision forjudicial review [B] the selection process for Senators. [C] the electoral college. [D] its creation of a federal judiciary. [E] its requirements for ratification. 23. Generally, the Antifederalists felt that the government created by the US. Constitution was [A] an insufficient check on the power of the states. [B] overprotective of individual rights. [C] barely strong enough to be effective. [D] too strong and too centralized. [E] too liberal. 24. A person cannot be imprisoned without first being brought before a judge, who in turn finds sufficient cause for his or her detention. This protection is known as I [A] certiorari. [B] judicial review. [C] habeas corpus. [D] ex post facto. [E] a Miranda right. 25. The text suggests the Anti federalists [A] had legitimate concerns. [B] had uncanny instincts for what the future might bring. [C] had no agreed-upon alternative to the Constitution. [D] All of these. [E] None of these. 26. T hree—fifths of the slaves were counted for purposes of [A] electing state legislatures. [B] allotting seats in the House of Representatives. [C] electing the president. [D] apportioning delegates to presidential conventions. [E] allotting seats in the Senate. 27. Which of the following statements most accurater characterizes the motives behind the support that different Framers gave to the U.S. Constitution? [A] Most Framers acted out of a mixture of motives with economic interests playing only a modest role. [B] These Framers who did not hold government debt but who did own slaves tended to support the US. Constitution. [C] The Framers acted in a manner that reflected the religious convictions of their respective states. [D] Those Framers who held debt but who did not own slaves tended to oppose the U.S. Constitution. [E] The support that different Framers gave to the US. Constitution tended to divide along class lines. (i 28. Most amendments to the U.S. Constitution have been ratified by the vote of [A] two—thirds of the representatives to a national convention. [B] one-half of the state legislatures. [C] two-thirds of the members of both houses of Congress. [D] ratifying conventions in three-fourths of the states. [E] three-fourths of the state legislatures. 29. Some critics of the separation of powers complain that, whereas the president is supposed to be in charge of the bureaucracy, in fact he has to share this authority with [A] cabinet appointees. [B] federal judges. [C] various interest groups. [D] state officials. [E] many members of Congress. 30. Presidents would be able to veto part of a bill while approving the rest if the U.S. Constitution permitted a [A] line-item veto. [B] veto. [C] provisional veto. [D] reverse-veto. [E] pocket veto. ...
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AP US Go Test 2 - m 2 TAKE-HOME 2 We Form Number 1 1....

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