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ch2applets - Instructions for applets related to Chapter 2...

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Instructions for applets related to Chapter 2. First applet: This applet compares the celestial sphere as seen by you on Earth and as seen by you hypothetically outside the whole sphere. You can drag either one around to change your perspective. Change the view so that you can really tell that you're looking at two 3-D objects. After this, click on the observer's coordinates in the lower left -- put yourself at UCF, latitude 28.6 N and longitude 81.1 W. Look to the right - in the Appearance Settings, click off the 'show 0h circle' and click off the 'show celestial equator'. At the far right, click on 'add star randomly' and a star appears in both of the upper panels. You can drag the star anywhere you like. Don't pay attention to 'right ascension' and 'declination' in the left panel, but you might recognize 'azimuth' in the right panel and you should definitely know 'altitude'. Drag the star so that it's somewhere circumpolar for you, and hit the 'start animation' button. Does the star go around the NCP the way you expect (clockwise or counterclockwise)? Watch how the globe of Earth spins within the celestial sphere in the left panel, and how that relates to what the stick figure sees in the right panel. Stop the animation and start moving north in latitude by dragging the white dot in the world map (lower left) -- don't change your longitude much, just change latitude; where does the star go? Why? Now start moving south in latitude; where does the star go then? Will the star always be circumpolar? Where can you see the star and where can you not? Now click the 'show circumpolar region' box. Again drag yourself around in latitude (but not in longitude).
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