prather-chap2 - Solutions to all Prather et al. workbook...

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Solutions to all Prather et al. workbook pages relevant to what we covered in Chapter 2. For section 1 of Chapter 2: "Position" - pp 1-2 "Motion" - pp 3-6 "Seasonal Stars" - pp 7-10 "Ecliptic" - pp 13-17 For section 2 of Chapter 2: "Path of the Sun" - pp 87-90 "Seasons" - pp 91-96 For section 3 of Chapter 3: "Cause of Moon Phases" - pp 79-82 "Predicting Moon Phases" - pp 83-86 ----------------------------------------------------------- Position: 1. The horizon as shown is not real, it's just an imaginary plane extended out from your position to the celestial sphere. Because what is the horizon, really? It's just bulk of _Earth_ preventing you from seeing the rest of the celestial sphere. 2. No - Earth's in the way! If Earth were transparent, you could see those stars. 3. Star B - never. Star A - just position 4. 6. Position 3. 7. It never rises or sets. It's always up. 9. You should have labeled NSEW on the horizon. Note that you should know the difference between the due-north horizon and the northern half of the sky, the due-east horizon and the eastern half of the sky, etc. 10. A2: south, midway up between the horizon and zenith. A3: west, low. A4: can't see it. B1: northeast, high. B4: north, low close to the horizon. ----------------------------------------------------------- Motion: 1. In Figure 2, the "6 PM" x would be position 3. 2. In Figure 1, the right-most X is 12 midnight, the top X is 6 AM, and the left-most X is 12 noon. In Figure 2, Position 4 is 12 midnight,
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Position 1 is 6 AM, and Position 2 is 12 noon. 3. Almost directly overhead, toward your zenith. 5. You should draw your arrows so that the star travels counterclockwise. But specifically, at the bottom X, the arrow should point straight to the right. At the top X, the arrow should point straight to the left. At the left X, the arrow should point straight down. At the right X, the arrow should point straight up. 6. When something is halfway between rising and setting, that means it's about on your meridian. In Figure 2, check out where Star A is on your meridian. That's due south. So that's the direction -- but how high up in the sky due south? Well about halfway between your horizon and the zenith. 7. The arrow should point up and to the right. Definitely not straight up! 8. Disagree with #1, Agree with #2. If it were moving straight up, the star would go to the zenith, which it clearly does not in Figure 2. 9. It would have moved a little bit straight down toward the north-northwest horizon. At noon the star would be up and to the left of the star's 6 PM position in Figure 3. (In other words, it's the left X in Figure 1.) At noon it's 6 hours from being at the location shown in Figure 3, so 15 minutes isn't very much time. Since it moves in a circle around Polaris, it would have moved a little bit downward. 10. Disagree. Some stars just barely get above the horizon -- they
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This note was uploaded on 11/09/2009 for the course AST 2002 taught by Professor Britt during the Fall '08 term at University of Central Florida.

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prather-chap2 - Solutions to all Prather et al. workbook...

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