MoreSorting01 - Shellsort Although this sort doesn't have...

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Unformatted text preview: Shellsort Although this sort doesn't have the fastest running time of all the sorting algorithms, the idea behind it is simple, yet it is fairly competitive with Quick and Merge sort for fairly decent sized data sets. Here is the basic idea: Rather than sorting all the elements at once, sort a small set of them, maybe every 5th element or so. (You can do this using an insertion sort.) Do this for 5 different sets of elements. Then sort every 3rd element, etc. Finally sort all the elements using insertion sort. The rationale behind this sort is as follows: A small insertion sort is quite efficient. A larger insertion sort can be efficient if the elements are already "close" to sorted order. By doing the smaller insertion sorts, the elements do get closer in order before the larger insertion sorts are done. Here is an example of shell sort: 12 4 3 9 18 7 2 17 13 1 5 6 First let's do a 5-sort, meaning, let's sort every 5th element: 5 2 3 9 1 7 4 17 13 18 12 6 Now, a 3-sort: 4 1 3 5 2 6 9 12 7 18 17 13 Finally a normal insertion sort will produce the sorted array: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 9 12 13 17 18 Notice that by the time we do this last insertion sort, most elements don't have a long way to go before being inserted. So now the question becomes, do we always do a 5, 3 and 1 sort? The answer is no. In general, we can see that shell sort will ALWAYS work as long as the last "pass" is a 1-sort. The important question is, how do we space out the previous sorts. In particular, we'll call h 1 , h 2 , h 3 , h t , an increment sequence. For shellsort, first we will sort every h t values using insertion sort, then every h t-1 values and so on...until we at last sort every h 1 values. (We must have h 1 =1 as previously mentioned.) What tends to work well is if each of the values in the increment sequence are in a geometric series. A good example would be 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, etc. Thus, if we were sorting 1000 values, our first sort may be a 256-sort. (Followed by a 128 sort, a 64 sort, etc.) Notice how quickly these initial "passes" will run. Generally, they will be O(n) time. As time goes on, they will be a bit slower, but not nearly as slow as the original insertion sort. In practice, it turns out that a geometric ratio of 2.2 produces the best results. (Roughly this would correspond to the gap sequence 1, 2, 5, 11, etc.) The actual average case analysis of this sort is too difficult. (Our textbook states that experimental results indicate an average running time of O(n 1.25 ).) A lower bound for sorts which swap adjacent elements only An inversion in a list of numbers is a pair of numbers that are out of order relative to each other. For example, in the list 7, 2, 9, 5, 4, the inversions are the following pairs: (7, 2), (7, 5), (7, 4), (9, 5), (9, 4), and (5,4). (Note that two elements can be inverted even if they are not adjacent to one another.) Several sorts, such as insertion sort, only swap adjacent elements....
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This document was uploaded on 11/09/2009.

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MoreSorting01 - Shellsort Although this sort doesn't have...

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