BI F09 O5, CW10 C27 HGP2

BI F09 O5, CW10 C27 HGP2 - BIO3350 CW10 Todays assignments...

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BIO3350 Dr. Kolchenko CW10 Today’s assignments include: 10A - Reviewing Concept 27 that describes the DNA sequence differences among individuals and species, and how they can originate and accumulate. 10B - Genomics and Its Impact on Science and Society: The Human Genome Project and Beyond, Part 2. The reading assignment is the section Genomics and Its Impact on Science and Society: The Human Genome Project and Beyond, Part 2 that i s posted below. Save your answers and questions for Assignment 10A and 10B as a 1997- 2003 Word file (if you are using the latest Word program for Vista, select the 2003 version) and submit it to the lecture section webpage by Tuesday, November 3, 11:59 p.m. The name of the file should include: CW10, space, your last name. At the top of the 1 st page there should be: your name, date, BIO 3350, CW10, and my name. Please insert page numbers at the bottom on the right. If the submission is late, the assignment cannot get more than 80% of the credit. If it is late for more than a week, there is no credit for the assignment. Please do not wait until the very last minute because there may be problems with internet connection, etc., and it is always better to have some time in reserve. Let me know if you have any questions. Best regards, Dr. Kolchenko Assignment 10A In order to do assignment 10A, go to http://www.dnaftb.org/dnaftb/27/concept/index.html and review the following concept. BIO 3350 Dr. Kolchenko Concept 27. Mutations are changes in genetic information. Here, we discuss the DNA sequence differences among individuals and species, and how they can originate and accumulate. Mutations (DNA changes) can be induced in different ways, and this feature was used to prove gene divisibility up to a single nucleotide of the
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DNA sequence. Crossing over (natural exchange of chromosome fragments) helped to explain the results. Steady rate of accumulating DNA changes allowed us to use it as a molecular clock and to answer fascinating questions about human evolution. After reading the Concept page, answer the following questions. 1. How similar are the DNA sequences from 2 individuals of the same species and how much difference is there? (The latest data show that the differences could be greater.) 2. What are different types of mutations? 3. The majority of mutations (differences in the sequence) occur in DNA regions that do not encode proteins. What could be the explanation for this? 4. What was used to induce mutations for the first time in the 1920s? ( Drosophila is a fruit fly.) 5. What are the other ways to produce mutations? 6. What do we call chemicals that can produce mutations? 7. Can DNA replication be a source of new mutations and why? After reading Animation pages, answer the following questions:
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This note was uploaded on 11/10/2009 for the course CST 168 taught by Professor Madhu during the Spring '09 term at American Academy of Art.

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BI F09 O5, CW10 C27 HGP2 - BIO3350 CW10 Todays assignments...

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