Ch. 13 ESTIMATING PROCESS

Ch. 13 ESTIMATING PROCESS - CHAPTER - 13 ESTIMATING PROCESS...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style ESTIMATING PROCESS CHAPTER - 13
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ESTIMATING USING HAND HELD DEVICES l The Need: Estimators need a way to increase efficiency and lessen the chance for error when collecting estimate information in the field. Hand-held devices ensure estimators have the information they need to collect all project details necessary to deliver and accurate and complete bid. l The Technology: Designed for hand-held devices, estimating programs or personal digital assistants (PDAs) equip estimators with all the tools needed to perform detailed takeoffs remotely. Then, when convenient, data can be transferred to desktop software to instantly generate a detailed estimate.
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Hand-held Estimating Device
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ESTIMATING CONSTRUCTION COSTS l The key to a good job and successful cost control is the development of a good estimate as the basis for bid submittal. l Estimating is the process of looking into the future and trying to predict project costs and resource requirements.
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TYPES OF ESTIMATES l Estimating methods vary in accordance with the level of design detail that is available to the estimator l Prior to the commencement of the design, when only conceptual information is available, a comprehensive unit such as a square foot of floor space or a cubic foot of usable space is used to characterize the facility being constructed. l The representative unit is multiplied by a price per unit to obtain a gross estimate (10% accuracy) of the facility cost. l A table of square foot and cubic foot building costs as given in the Building Construction Cost Data published by R.S. Means company is shown in fig. 13-1. l The conceptual estimate is useful in the schematic or budgetary phase, when design details are not available. These estimates are based on documents such as that given in fig. 2-2.
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TYPES OF ESTIMATES CONT’D l As the design detail increases, the designer maintains estimates of cost to keep the client informed of the general level of costs to be expected l The production of the plans and specifications usually proceeds in two steps l The first step is called preliminary design and offers the owner a pause in which to review construction before detail design commences l At this point in the design process, a preliminary estimate is prepared by the architect or AE to reflect expected costs based on more definitive data l Once the preliminary design has been approved by the owner, final or detail design is accomplished l The detail design phase culminates in the plans and specs that are given to the constructor for bidding purposes l In addition to these detailed design documents the AE produces a final engineer’s estimate including total job minus markup l This estimate should achieve approximately ± 3% accuracy since the total design is now available
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Figure 13-1 Costs Based on a Representative Unit
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TYPES OF ESTIMATES CONT’D l The owner’s estimate is used: To ensure that the design produced is within owner’s financial resources to construct (i.e., that the AE has not designed a gold-
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This note was uploaded on 11/11/2009 for the course CEIE 463 taught by Professor Bhargava during the Spring '09 term at George Mason.

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Ch. 13 ESTIMATING PROCESS - CHAPTER - 13 ESTIMATING PROCESS...

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