Ch. 16 MATERIAL MANAGEMENT

Ch. 16 MATERIAL MANAGEMENT - CHAPTER 16 MATERIAL MANAGEMENT...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style CHAPTER 16 MATERIAL MANAGEMENT
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FIBER REINFORCED POLYMER REBAR n The Need: Reinforced concrete is a very common building material for the construction of facilities and structures n Insufficient concrete cover, poor design or workmanship and the presence of large amounts admixtures and as well as environmental factors all can lead to cracking of the concrete and corrosion of steel bars n The Technology: composite materials made of fibers embedded in a polymeric resin, also known as fiber- reinforced polymers (FRP’s) have become an alternate to steel reinforcement for concrete structures
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Dry Dock #4 Pearl Harbor, Hawaii Caissons and port facilities
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MATERIAL MANAGEMENT PROCESS n In the traditional contractual relationship, the owner contracts with a GC or CM to build his facilities and with an architect to perform the design n The GC, through this contract with the owner, is obliged to perform the work in accordance with the architect’s instructions, specifications and drawings. Thus the architect is the owner’s agent during the design and construction of a project n The lines of communication between the three parties are established as shown in fig. 16-1 n The materials that comprise facilities in building construction are subject to review by the architect or design professional. n The contractor delegates responsibility for some of the categories of work involved in the project to subs and suppliers n As result of this delegation, a distinct life cycle evolves for the materials that makes up the project. n The four main phases of this cycle are shown in fig. 16-2
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Fig. 16-1 The Owner-Architect-Construction Relationship Fig. 16-2 Material Life Cycle
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THE ORDER n When the contract for construction is awarded, the GC immediately begins awarding subcontracts and purchase orders for the various parts of the work. How much of the work is subcontracted depends on the individual contractor n Some GC’s subcontract all of the work in an effort to reduce the risk of cost overruns and to have every cost item assured through stipulated sum subcontract quotations. Others perform almost all the work with their own field forces n The subcontractor, through the agreement, must provide all materials and perform all work described in the agreement n AGC of America publish the standard subcontract agreement for use by their members. See appendix G for the sample of this agreement n All provisions of the agreement between the owner and contractor are made part of the subcontract agreement by reference n The most important referenced document in the subcontract agreement is the General Conditions. Procedures for the submittal of shop drawings and samples of certain materials are established in the General Conditions n The General Conditions provide that “where a shop drawings or sample is required by the Contract Documents…….any related work performed prior to Engineer’s review and
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Ch. 16 MATERIAL MANAGEMENT - CHAPTER 16 MATERIAL MANAGEMENT...

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