Frankenstein Poovey and Mellor

Frankenstein Poovey and Mellor - Jonathan Gold Dr. Mary Mar...

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Jonathan Gold October 7, 2005 Dr. Mary Mar Frankenstein Response Poovey and Mellor Mary Poovey sees Frankenstein as a sign of its author's need for social acceptance and ambivalence toward feminine self-assertion. Mary Shelley chose to focus on the theme of Promethean desire, which has implications for both the development of culture and the individual creative act. Shelly fuses mechanistic psychological theories of the origin and development of character with the more organic theories generally associated with the Romantics. Poovey says that, Shelly combines the process of identity-formation with the notion that an individual’s desire has its own impetus and logic. Mary sees imagination as an appetite that can and must be regulated. If are imagination is aroused but is not controlled by human society, it will project itself into the natural world, becoming voracious. This principle constitutes the major dynamic of Frankenstein’s plot. Poovey further says, “As long as domestic relationships govern an individuals affections,
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Frankenstein Poovey and Mellor - Jonathan Gold Dr. Mary Mar...

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