Two Party History-08

Two Party History-08 - Lecture&Reading Supplemental

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History of the Two-Party System Even though  the Founders of the U.S. constitution  did  not mention  anything  about parties during  the  Constitutional Convention  in 1787, parties began to form early in the Republic. Thomas Jefferson  expressed  such dislike for the divisiveness of party that he said that if he could not go  to heaven, except as a member of a party, he would  choose not to go to heaven  at all. George Washington  warned  of the “baneful effects of party”  in his farewell address to the nation after  serving eight years as our first president. --Nonetheless, parties were forming  at the very same time.  Unlike interest groups, political parties  contest elections and  try to win control of the institutions of  government.  Candidates are recruited, and/or  choose to run for elected office under  a party label.  Parties try to run government  whereas interest groups  seek to influence government  to benefit their  members. The First Party System:  The Federalists vs. the Democratic (J effersonian) Republicans 1800-1824, including “the Era of Good Feelings” 1. Federalists , the party of Alexander  Hamilton  and  John Adams  proffered  a strong national  government  able to develop  and  maintain  a strong national economy, and  supported  by  commercial interests and  in northern  urban  areas.   - After the election of John Adams  for president  in 1796, the Federalists  passed  these acts to repress dissent and  opposition  to Federalist policies.  (A)  Aimed  primarily against the emerge in Jeffersonian  party.  Ten Democratic Republican            newspaper  editors and  printers were jailed and  fined for promoting  opposition. (B)    In response, the Democratic Republicans used  the Alien and  Sedition Acts to rally opposition                       in the states to Federalists, and  won  victory with Thomas Jefferson’s  controversial election            in 1800.     The Democratic Republicans , later known  as the  Democrats , found  the bulk of their support  from  more agrarian  interests in the South and  North. The Federalists and  Democratic Republicans were factions, but did  not function like modern  political  parties; they were very loosely organized.  The Democratic Republicans became dominant  in the two decades following  the election of  Jefferson, and  the Federalists became electorally impotent,outside  areas of New  England. This period  of relative non-party competition became known  as the “Era of Good Feelings”.
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This note was uploaded on 11/12/2009 for the course POSI 2310 taught by Professor Seigler during the Spring '08 term at Texas State.

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Two Party History-08 - Lecture&Reading Supplemental

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