Perceiving Motion_New Slide Show from Class Oct 13-1

Perceiving Motion_New Slide Show from Class Oct 13-1 -...

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Motion Perception
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But First, From the Previous Class
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What is this?
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Cue Approach to Depth Perception Oculomotor - cues based on sensing the position of the eyes and muscle tension. Convergence - inward movement of the eyes when we focus on nearby objects Accommodation - change in the shape of the lens when we focus on objects at different distances distant object near object lens flatter lens rounder
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Cue Approach to Depth Perception - continued Monocular - cues that come from one eye Pictorial cues Occlusion - when one object partially covers another Relative height - objects that are higher in the field of vision are more distant below the horizon (above the horizon = opposite effect). Relative size - when objects are equal size, the closer one will take up more of your visual field Perspective convergence - parallel lines appear to come together in the distance (linear perspective) Familiar size - distance information based on our knowledge of object size (coin experiment)
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Name four depth cues that are contained in this scene of Tucson, Arizona.
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Pictorial Cues - continued Atmospheric perspective - distance objects are fuzzy and have a blue tint Texture gradient - equally spaced elements are more closely packed as distance increases Shadows - indicate where objects are located
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Motion-Produced Cues Motion parallax - close objects in direction of movement glide rapidly past but objects in the distance appear to move slowly Deletion and accretion - objects are covered or uncovered as we move relative to them Also called occlusion-in-motion Give an example!
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Figure 8.13 (a) When the lifeguard looks at Frieda, the image of Frieda, Susan, and Harry fall on corresponding points on the lifeguard’s retinas, and the images of the other swimmers fall on noncorresponding points. (b) The locations of the images of Susan, Frieda, and Harry on the lifeguard’s retina.
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Figure 8.15 Crossed disparity occurs for objects in front of the horopter; uncrossed disparity occurs for objects behind the horopter. The arrows indicate that the retinal images move inward, toward the nose, as the object moves further away.
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Size constancy : Size-distance scaling: S = k (R x D) Perceived size = constant (retinal size x perceived distance) Small retinal size x Large p. distance = Large retinal size x Small p. distance
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Figure 8.24 Setup of Holway and Boring’s (1941) experiment. The observer changes the diameter of the comparison circle to match his or her perception of the size of the text circle. Each of the test circles has a visual angle of 1 degree. This diagram is not drawn to scale. The actual distance of the test circle was 100 feet.
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Figure 8.28 Results of Holway and Boring’s experiment. The dashed line marked physical size is the result that would be expected if the observers adjusted the diameter of the comparison circle to match the actual diameter of each test circle. The line marked visual angle is the result that would be expected if the
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This note was uploaded on 11/12/2009 for the course PSY 3321 taught by Professor Ceballos during the Spring '09 term at Texas State.

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Perceiving Motion_New Slide Show from Class Oct 13-1 -...

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