manometer_sheet - How Manometers Work While manometers may...

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How Manometers Work While manometers may seem to be complicated devices, they operate based on two simple principles: 1. Fluids exert pressure. This becomes very apparent to anyone who has ever been on an airplane. When the plane takes off, the air pressure decreases, since there is then less air pressing down on the plane. You feel this pressure difference in your ears, since the air outside your ear is at a lower pressure (corresponding to a higher elevation), and the pressure inside the ear (past the eardrum) is still at the higher pressure from ground level. Your ears “pop” when the tubes from the inside of the ear to your mouth open, rapidly releasing the pressure. (Or, you can avoid this by opening your mouth and wiggling your jaw. This keeps the tubes to the inside of the ear drum open, and keeps the pressure on the eardrum balanced.) This same effect is responsible for the water that gets stuck in your ears after you dive into a deep swimming pool- the water pressure forces water into your ears. You can also see this effect by submersing a balloon in water. As the balloon is pulled lower and lower, the volume decreases. This is because the increased pressure deeper in the water compresses the gas inside the balloon. What’s the point of all this, anyway?
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This note was uploaded on 11/12/2009 for the course CHEM 2190 at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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manometer_sheet - How Manometers Work While manometers may...

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