Lecture01_handout-F09

Lecture01_handout-F09 - CE-320 Microcomputers I Fall B 2009...

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CE-320 Microcomputers I Fall B 2009 Lecture 1 Page 1 Lecture 1 Introduction to Microcomputers Purpose: Explain the reasons for studying microcomputers and where this course fits in the progression of a microcomputer’s design Describe the two basic types of microcomputer architectures Cover the main internal components of a microcomputer Discuss the overall design flow of a program for a microcomputer
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CE-320 Microcomputers I Fall B 2009 Lecture 1 Page 2 Microcomputers, Microcontrollers, and Microprocessors The definition of “microcomputer” is slightly vague, but most people consider a microcomputer to be a relatively small, inexpensive computer that is contained on one or a few chips. A “microcontroller” is usually defined as a microcomputer on a single chip that has the program code stored in memory. Microcomputer, then, is commonly used to refer only to the subset of devices that requires an external memory chip to store the program. In either case, these devices are used in embedded systems, which are electronic devices that implement specific functions without most people even realizing the device contains a microcomputer. A “microprocessor” is the portion of a microcomputer that performs the majority of the calculations. This term makes most people think of Pentiums and Athlons. While these are microprocessors, they are used almost exclusively in desktop computers, laptops, and servers. Since these chips also require a number of external chips to function, they are not considered microcontrollers. The microprocessor used in a microcontroller or microcomputer determines which family it is in. For example, all of the different devices in the Freescale Star12 family have the same microprocessor on the chip, but each member of the family has a different amount of internal memory and onboard devices.
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CE-320 Microcomputers I Fall B 2009 Lecture 1 Page 3 Why Study Microcomputers? Microcomputers power embedded systems that are absolutely everywhere in today’s world. The average American may interact with 300 or more embedded systems every day, and a conservative statement is that 95% of all “microprocessors” sold each year end up in embedded systems instead of “computers.” In 2007, IEEE estimated that over 700,000 people worldwide were employed writing code for this class of devices. To give you a feel for how pervasive microcontrollers have become and why the discipline continues to expand, below is an extremely short list of embedded systems. Portable mp3 players
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Lecture01_handout-F09 - CE-320 Microcomputers I Fall B 2009...

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