Phil 264 - Goodman 1 - Goodman's "The New Riddle of...

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Goodman's "The New Riddle of Induction" (1965) The Significance of Goodman's "The New Riddle of Induction" Some philosophers are known for their attempts to solve age-old philosophical problems, such as: 1. What is the relation between the mind and body? 2. Are any of our actions genuinely free or are they all determined by antecedent conditions over which we have no control? 3. What, if anything, can we claim to know (rather than simply believe)? Although Goodman had some interest in these and other philosophical problems, he is also known for his having drawn attention to a previously unnoticed problem. The problem in question concerns the justification of inductive inferences, inferences which draw conclusions about what is not known from premises about what is known. The problem is basically this: Some inductive inferences appear to be valid; others appear to be invalid. Yet it is not clear how to draw the distinction between valid and invalid inductive inferences. More particularly, it is unclear how to explain the (apparent) fact that certain inductive inferences (such as that concluding that all emeralds are grue) are invalid . For such inferences are structurally similar to valid inductive inferences (such as that concluding that all emeralds are green). (See below for details.) Study Questions 1-5 1. What is Hume's problem of induction? Like all philosophical problems, Hume's problem can be formulated as a question. As the editor's of the text (p. 147) put it, How can inductive inferences from past regularities to the prediction of a future event ever be warranted? For instance, we assume that the sun will rise tomorrow because it has risen in the past (without fail). But what justification do we have for this assumption? After all, it is conceivable that the sun will not rise tomorrow, even though it has always risen in the past. 2. How does Hume explain our capacity of making inductive inferences?
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Phil 264 - Goodman 1 - Goodman's "The New Riddle of...

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