Phil 264 - Sartre

Phil 264 - Sartre - Jean-Paul Sartre's Being and...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Jean-Paul Sartre's Being and Nothingness (1943) Significance of Sartre's Work: As the editors of the text point out ("Sartre's Influence"), Sartre's influence extends beyond academia and into "popular Western culture." In particular, Sartre's influence can be seen in our familiarity with such concepts as: bad faith , authenticity , anguish , and radical freedom . These concepts all relate to Sartre's central concern: what it is to be human. Sartre's views are more familiar than those of his existentialist forefathers (Husserl and Heidegger) largely because (like his contemporary Albert Camus) he expressed his views through accessible works of fiction (such as Nausea and No Exit ). 10 Central Themes from Being and Nothingness 1. Appearance vs Reality: An Untenable Dualism Recall "metaphysical realism," the view Putnam argues against in his paper "Why there isn't a ready-made world." Metaphysical realism is the view that there is a mind-independent reality - a reality beyond appearances - that we have access to. It is the job of the philosopher (according to the metaphysical realist) to theorize about this reality that exists beyond what appears to us. Sartre (and Husserl and Heidegger before him) reject this duality flat-out. What exists is "nothing more than the series of appearances which manifest [what exists]." In other words, "the being of an existent is exactly what it appears." It is the job of the philosopher to reflect on the significance of these appearances - NOT to ask about some "reality" that allegedly lies beyond them. (Question to think about: Although Putnam and Sartre both reject metaphysical realism, their reasons for doing so are quite different - or are they?) In order to understand the nature of appearance s, one has to understand the nature of consciousness , as things appear to us in our consciousness of them. For Sartre... 2. Consciousness is Always Consciousness of Something Sartre is interested in how things appear to us in consciousness. This is the data, the subject matter, of philosophy.
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern