Chapter 6 - I. The Meaning of Balanced Equation 1....

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I. The Meaning of Balanced Equation 1. Balancing an equation ex) Combustion Reaction (p. 197) C 3 H 8 (g) + 5O 2 (g) 3CO 2 (g) + 4H 2 O(g) -the number of molecules of each element need to be equal, both on the left and the right side of a ‘balanced’ equation. -In our equation above, we have 3 C’s, 8 H’s, and 10 O’s on both side of the equation. 2. What we can’t have Decimals as coefficients Molecules that come out of nowhere Unbalanced equations II. Mole – Mole Conversion 1. Mole Ratio When an equation is balanced, it becomes easy for us to ‘read’ the mole ratio. C 3 H 8 (g) + 5O 2 (g) 3CO 2 (g) + 4H 2 O(g) In the above ‘balanced’ equation, we can say the ratio between the C 3 H 8 and O 2 is 1:5 ratio. Since we are dealing with moles of a molecule, not its mass, we can simply compare the ratio by simply using the number in front of the balanced equations. This does NOT work with an Unbalanced equation. You MUST have a balanced equation for this to work!!! 2. Mole – Mole Conversions Example 6.1 (pg. 199) If 1.14mol of CO 2 was formed by the combustion of C 3 H 8 , how many moles of H 2 O were also formed? C
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Chapter 6 - I. The Meaning of Balanced Equation 1....

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