ch12 - Chapter12 TheDesignoftheTaxSystem 12...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 12 The Design of the Tax System WHAT’S NEW IN THE THIRD EDITION: A more detailed explanation of the calculation of marginal tax rates has been added.  There are two new  In the News  boxes: “How Taxes Affect Married Women” and “The Case Against Taxing Capital Income.”  In addition, there is a new  Case Study  on “Iceland’s Natural Experiment.” LEARNING OBJECTIVES: By the end of this chapter, students should understand: how the U.S. government raises and spends money. the efficiency costs of taxes. alternative ways to judge the equity of a tax system. why studying tax incidence is crucial for evaluating tax equity. the tradeoff between efficiency and equity in the design of a tax system. CONTEXT AND PURPOSE: Chapter 12 is the third chapter in a three-chapter sequence on the economics of the public sector.  Chapter 10 addressed externalities. Chapter 11 addressed public goods and common resources. Chapter  12 addresses the tax system. Taxes are inevitable because when the government remedies an  externality, provides a public good, or regulates the use of a common resource, it needs tax revenue to  perform these functions. 227 THE DESIGN OF THE TAX  SYSTEM 12
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
228   Chapter 12/The Design of the Tax System The purpose of Chapter 12 is to build on the lessons learned about taxes in previous chapters.  We have seen that a tax reduces the quantity sold in a market, that the distribution of the burden of a tax  depends on the relative elasticities of supply and demand, and that taxes cause deadweight losses. We  expand the study of taxes in Chapter 12 by addressing how the U.S. government raises and spends  money. The difficulty of making a tax system both efficient and equitable is then discussed.
Background image of page 2
Chapter 12/The Design of the Tax System   229 KEY POINTS: 1. The U.S. government raises revenue using various taxes.  The most important taxes for the federal  government are individual income taxes and payroll taxes for social insurance.  The most important  taxes for state and local governments are sales taxes and property taxes. 2. The efficiency of a tax system refers to the costs it imposes on taxpayers.  There are two costs of  taxes beyond the transfer of resources from the taxpayer to the government.  The first is the distortion  in the allocation of resources that arises as taxes alter incentives and behavior.  The second is the  administrative burden of complying with the tax laws.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 18

ch12 - Chapter12 TheDesignoftheTaxSystem 12...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online