ME364 MET KS Ch21 - Chapter 21 Fundamentals of Machining 1...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1 Chapter 21 Fundamentals of Machining
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 Common Machining Operations Figure 21.1 Some examples of common machining operations.
Background image of page 2
3 The Turning Operation Figure 21.2 Schematic illustration of the turning operation showing various features.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4 Two-Dimensional Cutting Process Figure 21.3 Schematic illustration of a two-dimensional cutting process, also called orthogonal cutting: (a) Orthogonal cutting with a well-defined shear plane, also known as the Merchant Model. The tool shape, depth of cut, t o the cutting speed, V , are all independent variables, (b) Orthogonal cutting without a well- defined shear plane.
Background image of page 4
5 Factors Influencing Machining Operations
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6 Mechanics of Cutting Cutting ratio, r = t o t c = sin φ cos φ-α ( 29 Shear angle preditions: φ= 45 °+ α 2 - β 2 45 °+ α-β Velocities, V c = V sin cos ( 29 β is friction angle, μ is friction coefficient μ = tan β V c : chip velocity, V : cutting speed, V.t o = V c . t c (mass continuity) V c = V r
Background image of page 6
7 Chip Formation by Shearing Figure 21.4 (a) Schematic illustration of the basic mechanism of chip formation by shearing. (b) Velocity diagram showing angular relationships among the three speeds in the cutting zone.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
8 Chips Produced in Orthogonal Metal Cutting
Background image of page 8
9 To reduce tendency for built-up edge (BUE) : Increase cutting speed, Decrease depth of cut, Increase rake angle, Use a sharp tool, Use an effective cutting fluid, Use a tool with lower chemical affinity for the workpiece material.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chip Breaker Figure 21.7 (a) Schematic illustration of the action of a chip breaker. Note that the chip breaker decreases the radius of curvature of the chip and eventually breaks it. (b) Chip breaker clamped on the rake face of a cutting tool. (c) Grooves in cutting tools acting as chip breakers.
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/17/2009 for the course MECHANICAL ME 364 taught by Professor Prof.dr.abdülkerimkar during the Spring '08 term at Yeditepe Üniversitesi.

Page1 / 30

ME364 MET KS Ch21 - Chapter 21 Fundamentals of Machining 1...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online