{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Criminal Law Diamond 2008

Criminal Law Diamond 2008 - I a PenalCodes i ii...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
I. Introduction to Criminal Law a. Penal Codes i. Louisiana was the first to attempt to codify the criminal law ii. Some 38 states have their statutory scheme based upon the Model  Penal Code (MPC) iii. Common law and MPC are both applicable b. What is a Crime? i. Not all conduct is criminal ii. More than thoughts is necessary – we require conduct to have a  crime iii. Conduct is not criminal unless the government has formally stated  so 1. Morally condemnable behavior is not criminal unless  government has stated so iv. A crime is whatever the state says it is, but there are limits on what  the state can define as criminal behavior v. Due Process Clause 1. Supreme Court can rule state criminal statutes as  unconstitutional under the DPC 2. Limits the discretion of states to label behavior as criminal  3. Substantive limit on state power to define criminal conduct vi. Cruel and Unusual Punishment – 8th Amendment prohibits this,  placing a limit on state discretion in sentencing for defined crimes
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
vii. p.3, Conduct which if duly show to have taken place will incur a  formal and solemn pronouncement of the moral condemnation of  the community. c. Crime and Morals i. Crime will result in the “moral condemnation of the community” ii. Most or all crimes are morally repugnant, but not all morally  repugnant behavior is criminal iii. The moral reprehensibility standard does not apply to all crimes, so  crime must involve something than other merely immoral behavior d. Limits on Government i. No  ex post facto  laws – cannot pass a law that makes that which  has already occurred criminal behavior ii. Limits on the types of laws that legislatures can pass iii. Limits to how laws can be applied iv. State’s burden to convict a criminal is proof beyond a reasonable  crime of guilt of a crime 1. Highest burden of proof in our government v. Demand Curves 1. Freedom from Crime (peace in society) a. If we want a high degree of freedom from crime, we  would require a very low burden of proof b. We have a high burden of proof, meaning we do not  value freedom from crime as much
Background image of page 2
2. Individual liberty / Accuracy in punishment / Fairness /  Freedom from governmental tyranny (_______) a. If we want a high degree of ______, we would require  a high burden of proof (which we do) b. If we wanted a lower degree of _______, we would  require a lower burden of proof e. Burden of Proof i.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}