Author Fact Notebook - Author Fact Notebook English Dr...

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Author Fact Notebook English Dr. Ligon Herah Hashmi 11/04/2009 Author: Homer
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(Around 900- 800 BC) Biographical Facts: 1. Very little is known about Homer’s life, and his date of birth and death, hometown, and other such things are a source of debate to many critics. According to Herodotus, a famous Greek Historian, claimed Homer lived 400 years before his own time, placing his date of birth at 850; however some scholars say he lived closer to the supposed time of the Trojan war, which would place him around 1194-1184 BC. 1 2. Where Homer lived throughout his life is also up for discussion. Many scholars say he been born on the island of Chios (also spelled in English as Khios) in the Aegean Sea; in Smyrna, a seaport in western Turkey; in Colophon, near Ephesus, Turkey; on Rhodes, an Aegean island; in Salamis, Cyprus; or in Athens or Argos on the Greek mainland. 2 3. Scholars have gathered up information that Homer was blind, and a poet. 2 4. Some scholars believe that Homer may not have been one person, and he may have been several different people who are placed under one fictitious name: Homer. 2 5. It was said that Homer called himself a “singer” rather than a writer or poet, because he orally recited his works. 2 6. Because of the low amount of information on him, it is very difficult to determine specific details of his life. It was not possible for scholars to find out whether he was married, or when he died, or other such information. 2 Bibliographical Facts: 1. Homer is credited for two of the most famous works ever existed: The Iliad and the Odyssey. When Homer composed The Iliad and The Odyssey , the events in both stories were already at least 600 years old. Thus, the plots unfold in an age when recorded history was in its infancy, about 3,200 years ago. 2 2. In each epic, humans–often noble persons of royal lineage–interact with the gods, sometimes obeying them, sometimes defying them. The plot of each epic consists of a series of exploits and adventures that help shape and define the main character and provide examples of heroism, wisdom, and other desirable qualities for the audience to imitate. 2
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3. The Iliad and The Odyssey are classified as epic poems, long narrative works that are highly formal and elevated in tone but easy to comprehend. Some translators present these epics in prose, making them read like novels. 2 4. The Iliad is the story of a brief event in the ninth year of the Trojan war (which the Greeks claim lasted ten years); the great hero Achilles is offended when the leader of the Greeks, Agamemnon, takes a slave girl Achilles has been awarded. Achilles withdraws from the battle and prays to his mother, Thetis, a goddess, to turn the tide of battle against the Greeks. The gods grant Achilles his prayer, and he does not return to battle until his best friend is killed by the great Trojan hero, Hector. Achilles throws himself into the battle, fights Hector, and kills him; in a final gesture of contempt, he drags Hector's lifeless body around the walls of
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This note was uploaded on 11/19/2009 for the course ENGL 1341 taught by Professor Ligon during the Spring '09 term at University of St. Thomas-Texas.

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Author Fact Notebook - Author Fact Notebook English Dr...

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