psy352Q&ASleepREM

psy352Q&ASleepREM - Q8: Does REM happen in the deep...

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Q8: Does REM happen in the deep sleep stages? Q9: Are sleepwalkers acting out their dreams? Q10: Do parasomnias always occur during deep sleep? A8-10: The answer to these questions is NO. Please see the “sleep primer” slides for clarifications about REM sleep and additional information on the sleep stages to supplement and reinforce what was said in class. If you have trouble understanding anything on these slides, please ask follow-up questions. Q12: Are ALL sleep problems more common in children than adults? A12: No. Many sleep problems are more common in adults than children. Indeed, it is easier to name the sleep disorders more common in children than to name those more common in adults. Nightmare disorder and REM Sleep Behavior Disorder(both REM-stage disorders) are more common in children than adults. Most “benign” (not medically dangerous), spontaneously occurring delta- wave parasomnias like sleepwalking and sleep-talking and sleep terrors run in families and are more common in children than adults. Just about all other sleep problems are more common in adults than kids (including insomnia, hypersomnia, circadian rhythm sleep disorder, sleep apnea, substance-related sleep problems, and many others.) In clinical practice, adults are more commonly seen for sleep problems than are children. And mild behavior problems surrounding sleep and bedtime (e.g., won’t sleep in own bed, resists bedtime, etc) are the most common sleep-related reason for children to be presented to a clinician, whereas adults often present due to a variety of more severely interfering sleep problems. Q13: I feel confused about REM deprivation. Is this the same as sleep deprivation? Can you be REM deprived even though you’re not sleep-deprived? Can you be sleep- deprived without being REM-deprived? Sleep deprivation is a more general term than REM deprivation. Sleep deprivation means being deprived of sleep. REM deprivation means being deprived of the REM stage of sleep. When you are sleep-deprived, you are typically REM-deprived (for more on why, see below).
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However, when you are REM-deprived, you may or may not be sleep-deprived; you may be selectively deprived of REM without being deprived of sleep. The most common type of sleep deprivation is overall deprivation that comes from not spending enough hours sleeping. This is usually what we mean when we use the term “sleep deprivation” in a general way. Standard sleep deprivation affects all the sleep stages, but it disproportionately impacts REM because the longest REM stages occur in hours 6 through 8 of sleep. If you don’t get enough hours of sleep, you miss out on the heaviest REM portions. A lot of the negative outcomes of general sleep deprivation may in actuality be due to the REM deprivation that general sleep deprivation
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psy352Q&ASleepREM - Q8: Does REM happen in the deep...

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