Findings - IDEAS AND ACTIVITIES IDEAS FOR DEVELOPING PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS SKILLS A Teacher Resource Supplement to the Virginia Early Intervention

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IDEAS AND ACTIVITIES IDEAS AND ACTIVITIES FOR DEVELOPING FOR DEVELOPING PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS SKILLS A Teacher Resource Supplement to the Virginia Early Intervention Reading Initiative Virginia Department of Education June 1998
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Section 3: Phonological Awareness 3-1 Purpose Competence in early language literacy provides a strong foundation for successful reading. A necessary component of this process is the development of phonemic awareness skills. Dr. Reid Lyon, National Institutes of Health, has stated that reading deficits in many children can be prevented if diagnosed early and a research based intervention is implemented. According to Dr. Jager-Adams, the second best predictor of early reading achievement is an awareness of the sound bites (phonemes) in a spoken word. Researchers have found that phonemic awareness is the one area of instruction that has been missing, or that may have been inadequately addressed with struggling kindergarten and first grade students. Phonemic awareness is not phonics. Phonics is the relationships between sounds and their symbols (letters), and the methods of instruction used to teach those relationships. Phonemic awareness is the ability to identify and manipulate speech sounds. It is also the understanding that speech is composed of a sequence of sounds (phonemes) that are combined and can be recombined to form other words. This ability must be present if a child is to successfully map the sounds onto print to decode words. The purpose of this resource book is to help school personnel better understand how phonemic awareness links oral language with emerging reading and writing skills and to provide teachers with activities and materials that can be used to teach phonemic awareness skills . The majority of the activities are contained in Section 3: Phonological Awareness . The other sections serve as a framework to show the relationship and sequence of phonological awareness to the process of learning to read. The anticipated benefits from early intervention include: ! An improved primary reading programs and improved reading skills for Virginia’s children. ! A higher percentage of children passing the third grade Virginia Standards of Learning Reading Test. ! A reduction in the number of referrals for special education services. ! A higher percentage of children being promoted in the primary grades. ! A reduction in the number of children requiring remediation in later grades.
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Section 3: Phonological Awareness 3-2 SECTION 3 PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS
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Section 3: Phonological Awareness 3-3 Definitions PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS The ability to attend to the phonological or sound structure of language as distinct from its meaning. Types of phonological awareness include: phonemic awareness, rhyme awareness, syllable awareness, word awareness, and sentence awareness. PHONEMIC AWARENESS
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This note was uploaded on 11/19/2009 for the course ED 21086 taught by Professor Jeanmitchell during the Spring '09 term at California State University , Monterey Bay.

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Findings - IDEAS AND ACTIVITIES IDEAS FOR DEVELOPING PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS SKILLS A Teacher Resource Supplement to the Virginia Early Intervention

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