Meeting_Children_s_Individual_Literacy_Learning_Needs.sflb.ashx

Meeting_Children_s_Individual_Literacy_Learning_Needs.sflb.ashx

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Meeting Young Children's Individual Literacy Learning Needs Presented by Dr. Kathy Barclay, Professor Western Illinois University KH-Barclay@wiu.edu Southeast Regional IRA Conference New Orleans, LA November 30, 2009 1
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Continuum of Children’s Development in Early Reading and Writing Phase 1: Awareness and exploration (goals for preschool) Children  explore  their  environm ent  and  build  the  foundations  for learning  to  read  and  write. Children  in presch o ol  can enjoy  listening  to and  discussing  storybooks understand  that print carries  a  mes s a g e engag e  in reading  and  writing  attempts identify labels  and  signs  in their  environm ent participate  in rhyming  game s identify som e  letters  and  make  som e  letter- sound  matche s use  known  letters  or  approximations  of letters  to repres e nt written  languag e  (esp e cially  meaningful  words  like  their  name  and   phrase s   such  as  “I love  you”) Phase 2: Experimental reading and writing (kindergarten) Children  develop  basic  conc epts  of print and  begin  to engag e  in and   experiment  with reading   and  writing. Children  in kindergarten  can retell simple  narrative  stories  or  informational  texts use  descriptive  languag e  to explain  and  explore recognize  letters  and  letter- sound  matche s show  familiarity with rhyming  and  beginning  sounds understand  left-to-right and  top- to-bottom  orientation  and  familiar   concepts   of print match  spoken  words  with written  ones begin  to write  letters  of the  alphabet  and  som e  high- frequency  words from: Learning to Read and Write: Developmentally Appropriate Practices for Young Children: A position statement of the  International Reading Association and the National Association for the Education of Young Children. Copyright © 1998. All rights reserved. National Association for the Education of Young Children. In Young Children , July 1998, 53 (4): 30–46. 2
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“Recognizing the early beginnings of literacy acquisition too often has resulted in use of inappropriate  teaching practices suited to older children or adults perhaps but ineffective with children in preschool,  kindergarten, and the early grades” (p. 31).  “Teaching practices associated with outdated views of literacy development and/or learning theories  are still prevalent in many classrooms. Such practices include extensive whole-group instruction and  intensive drill and practice on isolated skills for groups or individuals. These practices, not particularly  effective for primary-grade children, are even less suitable and effective with preschool and  kindergarten children” (p. 31)
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This note was uploaded on 11/19/2009 for the course ED 21086 taught by Professor Jeanmitchell during the Spring '09 term at California State University , Monterey Bay.

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Meeting_Children_s_Individual_Literacy_Learning_Needs.sflb.ashx

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