Kidney Filtration

Kidney Filtration - Kidney Filtration Blood in the Urine...

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Blood in the Urine The filtrate only includes small molecules and water. No red blood cells get filtered. Therefore, no blood appears in the urine under normal conditions. If you find blood in your urine, you should contact your physician as soon as possible because it could be a sign of kidney problems. In the nephron, approximately 20 percent of the blood gets filtered under pressure through the walls of the glomerular capillaries and Bowman's capsule. The filtrate is composed of water, ions (sodium, potassium, chloride), glucose and small proteins (less than 30,000 daltons -- a dalton is a unit of molecular weight). The rate of filtration is approximately 125 ml/min or 45 gallons (180 liters) each day. Considering that you have 7 to 8 liters of blood in your body, this means that your entire blood volume gets filtered approximately 20 to 25 times each day! Also, the amount of any substance that gets filtered is the product of the concentration of that substance in the blood and the rate of filtration. So the higher the concentration, the greater the amount filtered or the greater the filtration rate, the more substance gets filtered. The glomerular capillaries, peritubular capillaries
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Kidney Filtration - Kidney Filtration Blood in the Urine...

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