IQ Test - IQ Test 1. Never -, Raphael treated everyone he...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
IQ Test 1. Never -------, Raphael treated everyone he knew with respect and as an equal. (A) extroverted (B) magnanimous (C) cooperative (D) effusive (E) supercilious 2. Many in the village regarded their chief as ------- of -------: he epitomized extreme economy. (A) an ambassador . . benevolence (B) an icon . . arrogance (C) a paragon . . frugality (D) a critic . . discretion (E) a symbol . . munificence 3. Readers eager to understand and enjoy poetry will especially appreciate poet Nikki Giovanni’s ------- insights, which are ------- by abstruse allusions. (A) esoteric . . unrelieved (B) baffling . . motivated (C) penetrating . . obscured (D) lucid . . unencumbered (E) prosaic . . inspired Passage 1 Line By definition, stand-up comics are supposed to stand up and be comical. There they are, on stage, pattering a string of remarks into microphones for the audience to chuckle over. I pity them for having to make such an unnatural 5 effort. I’ve never found a single stand-up comedian truly funny. For a long time, I assumed I possessed a deficient sense of humor; now, I’m not so sure. Humor, at its base, is contrast: the unexpected intruding shockingly into the thrum of the mundane. We don’t expect humor; humor is 10 thrust upon us. A stand-up comic who announces to the world that humor is coming will never be funny in the
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Line most profound sense of the term. Passage 2 Line I have, for as long as I can recall, been amazed by stand-up comics—chiefly by their courage, though 15 effrontery may be closer to the exact word. They stand there alone and propose to make an audience of strangers forget their personal troubles and laugh. The announcing of it beforehand is where the nerve comes in. Wit, critics have observed, involves saying or doing the unanticipated. 20 Yet in one sense, professional comics do the opposite of this: by their very presence they establish an anticipation— you will laugh at what I am about to say or do—and then boldly set out to fulfill it. 4. The author of Passage 1 would most likely respond to what the “critics have observed” (Passage 2, lines 18–19) with (A) anger (B) ambivalence (C) mild cynicism (D) grudging acceptance (E) complete agreement Passage This passage is adapted from a book published in 1994. Line Newspapers, magazines, brochures, advertisements, and labels surround us everywhere, turning our waking environment into a profusion of texts to be read, glanced at, or ignored. It is amusing to recall how the early- 5 sixteenth-century philosopher Erasmus reportedly paused on a muddy thoroughfare to scrutinize a rare scrap of printed paper flickering at his feet. As we now find ourselves at a cultural watershed— as the quantity of information we receive continually 10 increases and as the fundamental process of transmitting information is shifting from page to screen—it may be
Background image of page 2
Line time to ask how modifications in our way of reading may impinge upon our mental life. For how we receive information bears vitally on the ways we experience and
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 14

IQ Test - IQ Test 1. Never -, Raphael treated everyone he...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online