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Rapid Communication Draft - Experimental Study of Wall...

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Experimental Study of Wall Effect in Viscosity Measurements Grant Corley, Albert Ho Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853 Abstract The falling sphere technique used commonly in fluid mechanics involves viscous frictional forces beyond those predicted by traditional flow analysis, commonly referred to as the wall effect. The Dinsdale and Moore flow model is traditionally accepted to account for this wall effect, but has not been adequately tested for viscosities in the regime of 1-20 poise. Due to this insufficiency, a different model has been proposed by Schottenheimer that uses an exponential relationship to predict viscosities in this range. Laboratory measurements of glycerin viscosity for spheres of different densities and radii fail to verify the recently proposed Schottenheimer theory. In many cases where viscous drag is influential, it is helpful to have an accurate numerical value for fluid viscosity. A common viscosity measurement method is the falling sphere technique. However, this method yields apparent viscosity measurements that are uncorrected for viscous frictional forces beyond those predicted by traditional flow analysis, a result commonly referred to as the wall effect. The Dinsdale and Moore flow model is traditionally accepted to account for this wall effect, but has not been adequately tested for viscosities in the regime of 1-20 poise. Due to this insufficiency, a different model has been proposed by Schottenheimer that uses an exponential relationship to predict viscosities in this range. Using the falling sphere technique to find the apparent viscosity of glycerin, a fluid in the regime of 1-20 poise, we can test both theories against experimental results.
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