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1_1_EE1-lecture01

1_1_EE1-lecture01 - Lecture 1 Jan 10 Introduction to...

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Unformatted text preview: Lecture 1, Jan 10 Introduction to Electromagnetics The electrical force The electrical force is billion-billion-billion-billion times stronger than gravitation (~ 1040 times). There are two kinds of ‘matter’, called positive and negative. Like kinds repel and unlike kinds attract. All matter is a mixture of positive protons and negative electrons, which are repelling and attracting with this great force. The charges are so perfectly balanced in nature that when you stand near someone else you don’t feel any force at all. If you were standing close to someone and each of you had one percent more electrons than protons the repelling force would be enough to lift a ‘weight’ equal to that of the entire earth ! Atoms are made of positive protons in the nucleus and negative electrons in the shell: 0 ° prns 0 Quantum physics prohibits protons and electrons to “get on top of each other” due to their electrical attraction. Positive protons are held together by a different force (the nuclear force), which acts only on very small distances inside the nucleus and overcomes the electrical repulsion. If the nuclear force is overcome (e.g. in a nuclear reactor) the protons fly apart due to the electrical force. Magnetic force Electrical forces also depend on the motion of charges in a complicated way. The magnetic force is really one aspect of an electrical effect. The electromagnetic force is one of the four fundamental forces (presently) known to physics: 1. Strong nuclear force (holds the nucleus of an atom together) 2. Electromagnetic force 3. Weak nuclear force (responsible for radioactive decay of atoms) 4. Gravitational force _2_ [h +ra JAN: Lion +o Vechv g SCaJau-z qvan-ihfi W‘Wse Vodve qug be Hpt-eSevJ-zck ha a Sihgke Hal "V‘MBQF QM) Tempera MR ' Line I rwmber 0C Sada}: 3Sé?= ”0°C MS 57 Vii-on Has bo-H‘ A w‘Wi-«Ae final at O‘AV-chch "2‘ Space X‘ (3% (3) f (3,2)2A =. . Mag-[AxemaL-icmuj 0k VeC‘l'Ov- ‘5 a Cclke chic». 0" Scalars‘, 0K6. ‘por €44 oumeh sic», . A Vec+or has A mar}qu 2 wreath». BUT V39 099;“ Lflng—H (or vuaguLMA) a-( vec+or~ -€o“ows 43mm P5+angora§ A=W=lél ._’;.. Ccvro‘AMR SWRW X é=(~o) '7: Vec-(mr a1%¥-ra : AMA ‘Roh 4:. Row; PAP (kl/(era 9mm... [aw : 2):. “hi 05833 +k€ Cow-MVVLAA'1VQ [aw .' 43+ 12 = 12+ 6 W A 01550 clad-{~42 flaw : 43+ (§+£)= (é.+71)+-C ~ I». Practice eac/X Componewl' ‘5 he“k°k .kkmo‘bd-Vj' _ ( s (I Q’%' 46‘ (‘15) I E: (:10) _-.-) A+B= (3::3) (1‘? 3) 2+l2. W .443. _l+—- [VIC/(HPRCan-Ok ‘35 S‘Calars” 94’“ = 9(3): ifs?) Szx +323 32 (xhufi—zz) : = s-W _. 3-. (5| USVaX mvlupumbto». Mb, arrow); (5+")‘(é+g) = 5‘. (A41?) + “($414.11) = é<$+r)+ 304+) "M For +Nm+: OU W\€"\ 970m; WW3 L be 4.3% Same a». 9*pr S’Me o ’r aux 9a, w u.“ ’Deq'fi-Hou oC- a (hack; \ Val/kc 0‘- a Sedan- /Vec4-o.~ o‘z‘oowfig an 4-3-4 100L440». l‘ = PC X, U)! 2—) realm— {Hawk 66,: 4 (Kim?) Vec‘w “Vt Exampk oC vec‘or WM Gum Shea“. VCL’OCH, ,Y, = 2 e 2 Icon. 0( 0' +1.? 2.4:0 x: (g) . —Q~— UnH— vec+or s 5 howl “(WM)“ 44* mth& I 7 Vechr L. U‘flie vector = “WHOL‘ M r (Inu- vecLor UV‘H' ved-org 0" Cau- LC So‘au.‘ Coo.- 4&me Sm LM: 7' ( .. 0 0 fix-(g)’ £3=(ol ’£?:{I0) 95% (QM—- ‘zufl = (a?! el Q= -’ 3 “115/ m; 7"“ Okrl' ‘ PM 0694‘ K‘- OKIS‘C Caueak 56¢;qu- - (Droa‘AAoL COHS:9(‘T {J‘Q {foHow‘La Ph‘ahhs 60K Neda-QC? I T; ...... 5. 0““, PW COMPOWL " CWMBVL‘S' +9 Per 4oru~<o( F Won-K "' ll "fiL-C‘as‘g f'k 032m a 504” ”IV'“("L'4 11 WW4 Per {chuck u .' ——6_ "beam... at M-Pwo‘mo‘: [5.5: IélJQl-Cogé fin PMGWC: {5'12 : Ax'Bx + A3135 +A3'BE 2 7. (6.45: A =14“ S‘u‘hcz COS(€)=/ muck QA a”. = ‘ Qx' 25., = 5x- g; : avg} =0 S‘i'tct Ces (00°F 0 130" Pro dMO“ ‘9') Qero ic vech S “‘1 er a“: 0940,. A.’B = B. A [COMWU‘KRVQ) The CPOS‘S [3" AC} @192 Catleok VGC‘W“~ dare (3(ch- 43%]: g, 50% [DerpéhdawLGr 4" r» coonkihad-e $90sz axa = l-l-sMeWox = 25; eqvflll“) 9‘5 X 9% : 2‘), Q} X 5x : 9% ’6“) x fix = " Q2. éxE-t - Exé hol- Camkuve Axé= 0 ‘OeCMS‘e §V;\(0):0 TL‘Q. Crag; PMMC‘. C3 Zero EC vec‘crg‘ a,” Paralkz {-4 €44 0+“ (Pm/3)><(S-§)= r5 AX < 137‘ fix + 137%“) +13? $3.): =AXB “X Qx + AXB" QXXQ, + AXBi-Q‘» X Q V-P X 2_ + 0 a} ‘1? W) + A’B" Q‘Jxflx + W + A513; fibxg‘k _ \‘W ...
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