Jane Eyre Rochester and Rivers.pptx - Edward Fairfax...

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Edward Fairfax Rochester & St John Rivers
Rochester as a Byronic Hero St John Rivers as a foil to Rochester Rochester’s and St John’s relationships with Jane Overview
Byronic Hero: An idealised but dark and flawed character, often plagued with internal conflict Rochester is described as having a ‘gentleman’s tastes and habits’ (104) and being ‘unimpeachable’ (105) – clearly an elevated portrayal Yet, Bronte points out his melancholic disposition Rochester as a Byronic Hero
Rochester’s forlorn and brooding features ‘He had a dark face, with stern features and a heavy brow’ (113) ‘His grim mouth, chin, and jaw – yes, all three were very grim, and no mistake’ (119-120) Rochester’s rugged nature ‘the frown, the roughness of the traveller’ (114) Rochester as a Byronic Hero
These dark and brooding characteristics are suggestive of a deeper, internal conflict – his imprisonment of Bertha in Thornfield Rochester confesses his emotional distress to Jane: ‘I was dazzled, stimulated: my sense were excited; and being ignorant, raw and inexperienced, I thought I loved her’ (305) ‘I tried the companionship of mistresses’ (311) ‘confine[d] her with due attendance and precautions at Thornfield’ (308) Rochester as Byronic Hero
Bronte exposes Rochester’s sinful past and his imprisonment of Bertha to reveal how he is a deeply flawed individual who has acted in ways that are socially reprehensible Yet, Bronte ultimately absolves Rochester from his wayward ways by portraying his journey as one from sin to redemption Rochester as Byronic Hero
Rochester’s shift from an unrepentant, stubborn individual to a penitent man of God is aided by religious enlightenment ‘Remorse is the poison of life’ (136)

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