Gas Laws 28 September 2009

Gas Laws 28 September 2009 - Georgia Institute of...

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Georgia Institute of Technology | CHEM 1310 | Recitation Module Gas Laws Recitation Basic Properties of Gases: The Fundamentals of Gas Laws Gas volume changes greatly with pressure. Gas volume changes greatly with temperature. Gases have a low viscosity. Low densities (different units are in fact used). The units for gas densities are reported as g/L while for liquids the densities are reported as g/mL. This is because gases occupy a greater volume. High miscibility. The high miscibility is a direct result of the lack of attractive or repulsive forces that commonly exist among molecules and atoms. Gases have high kinetic energies are individual molecules or atoms rarely come into contact; therefore, the issue with repulsive or attractive is not an issue because of the high kinetic energies and constant motion of gases. Gases are defined by four variables: pressure, temperature, volume, and the number of moles of the gas molecules. The Relationships Among the Four Parameters Boyle’s Law : States that pressure and volume are inversely proportional given that all other parameters are held constant. This is represented as V 1/P or PV = constant A word about proportionality: anytime two parameters are proportional they can readily be represented mathematically using multiplication or division operators. Boyle’s Law is often written as P 1 V 1 = P 2 V 2 .
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Georgia Institute of Technology | CHEM 1310 | Recitation Module Charles’ Law : V T = constant States that volume and temperature are directly proportional if all other variables are held constant. This is represented mathematically as 1 atm 1 atm 1 atm The direct proportionality associated with Charles’ Law is represented mathematically as V 1 T 2 = V 2 T 1 Guy-Lussac’s Law: P 1 T 2 = P 2 T 1 This law states that pressure and temperature are directly proportional if volume and the number of moles is held constant. Therefore, as with Charles’ Law we can derive a similar relationship. Avogadro’s Law Using these variables collectively, the ideal gas law is derived. : This law defines the relationship between volume and the number of moles. The volume of a gas is directly related to the number of moles; therefore, regardless of the identity of the gas, whether H 2 , N 2 , or O 2 , one mole will always occupy the same volume. Volume and the number of moles are directly proportional. This is not the most important consequence of Avogadro’s Law. The most important development from Avogadro’s work is the relationship that at
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This note was uploaded on 11/30/2009 for the course CHEM 1101 taught by Professor Bottomley during the Fall '08 term at Georgia Tech.

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Gas Laws 28 September 2009 - Georgia Institute of...

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