Feeding and Nutrition In Brief

Feeding and Nutrition In Brief - Feeding and Nutrition In...

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Unformatted text preview: Feeding and Nutrition In Brief AN 161 Spring, 2006 The single most important nutrient Fresh, clean, unfrozen water What horses should eat Forage What we feed them Concentrates Digestive physiology in a nutshell Small stomach Large hindgut Designed for frequent ingestion of small amounts Dietary fiber digestion takes place largely in hindgut Stomach and small intestine Digestion of starch, protein, fat, and fat- soluble vitamins takes place in stomach and small intestines Ingesta not digested in stomach and small intestine passes into cecum and large colon Hind gut Cecum and large colon holds ~21-24 gallons Populated by bacteria and protozoa which break down fiber, produce volatile fatty acids B complex vitamins Vitamin K Absorption of phosphorus Basic nutritional requirements Energy Carbohydrates from gain and forage Fat Protein Young horses require high quality protein Minerals Balance as well as amount Vitamins Overall needs will vary with age, reproductive status and activity levels Did I mention water? Meeting nutritional requirements Forage first! Pasture— Most natural form of food for horse Not always possible Hay— Next best thing Grass Grass/legume mix Meeting nutritional requirements If forages cannot meet energy needs, add grains and/or fats and oils Fat can be fed up to 10% of total ration Using fats instead of large amounts of grain lessens incidence of a variety of digestive and metabolic disorders Grains...
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Feeding and Nutrition In Brief - Feeding and Nutrition In...

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