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PsychopharmLecture4_Ch3-1

PsychopharmLecture4_Ch3-1 - Space Time...

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Principles of Chemical Transmission 3 Dimensions of chemical transmission Space Time Function (pre and post-synaptic) Co-localization of neurotransmitters
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Chemical Transmission Space Wired Transimission – Classical chemical synapse Active zone, release into restricted area on a single  neuron “Volume Transmission” – neurotransmitter spills from site  with passive diffusion – Affects many neurons Time Fast (ionotropic) – Open ion channels Slow (metabotropic) – 2nd messenger pathways
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Chemical Transmission Continued Function Excitation-secretion coupling:  Ca++  dependent process Vesicles near active sites of the axon terminal dock, fuse  and release the neurotransmitter Some neurotransmitters, like Monamines are packaged  “on site” in the axonal terminal Transporter, or reuptake pump, brings neurotransmitter  back into the cell from the synaptic cleft
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Chemical Transmission Continued Function (PreSynaptic) Precursors for Peptides are produced in cell body, transported  down the axon and where they enter synaptic vesicles and are  converted into peptides for release at the terminal. No (or limited) transport of peptides back into cell, instead  enzymes break down the peptides in the synaptic cleft.
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1-9 Stahl S M, Essential Psychopharmacology (2000) pre-pro peptide gene endoplasmic reticulum primary mRNA prepropeptide mRNA prepropeptide signal peptidase propeptide converting enzyme synaptic vesicle peptide peptide catabolic peptidase inactive metabolite Some Examples of Peptides in the CNS: Substance P – Signals Pain Prodynorphin – Reduces pain Enkephalin – Reduces pain
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Peptides – Large Vesicles
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Principle of Co-Localization
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Now Let’s Talk About Now Let’s Talk About Receptors Receptors 1. Organization of a single receptor 1. 3 Types of Receptor 1. Receptor Subtypes and Ligand Binding Agonists/Antagonists Allosteric Modulation
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1. Organization of a Single 1. Organization of a Single Receptor Receptor 3 parts of a receptor Extracellular domain Transmembrane domains Intracellular domain A string of amino acids form the protein, and the amino acids wind their way in and out of the cell membrane, which gives rise to the extracellular, transmembrane and intracellular portions of the receptor Naming of Receptors – The amino acids that form the receptor give the name, ex. From book – tyrosine kinase (Trk) receptors are derived from the amino acid tyrosine .
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= amino acid unit outside of the cell inside of the cell amino acids in a chain membrane NH 2 COOH 2-1 Stahl S M, Essential Psychopharmacology (2
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2. Three Types of Receptor
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