child1_ch14_11.13.outline

child1_ch14_11.13.outline - Slide 1 Infant and Child...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Slide 1 Infant and Child Development Chapter 14 Tuesday November 13, 2007
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Slide 2 Announcements ‘Pop-culture’ worksheet due Friday Optional drafts due by/on the 19 th (email) Plan for next week Class on Wednesday 11/21 Office hours: Monday 11:45- 12:45, 433 Tillett Hall
Image of page 2
Slide 3 Moral Reasoning Positive Justice (Damon) How to divide resources or distribute rewards fairly Findings: 4- and 5-year-olds : Focus primarily on gratifying themselves (“I should have it because I want it”), but begin to justify decisions with appeals to characteristics such as size and sex (“The biggest should get the most.” “We should all get some because we’re girls.”) Between ages of 5 and 7 : Equality and reciprocity. Believe that all participants have equal claim, (“It’s only fair for everyone to get the same.”), then notions of merit and deservingness appear (“She did good but he did bad”) Age 8 and onward : Begin to take particular circumstances into consideration (e.g., greater contribution to group’s work gets more, and those handicapped in some way)
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Slide 4 14- Moral Development Domains of Moral Development 1. Reasoning (Piaget, Kohlberg, Damon) 1. Behavior- prosocial and antisocial 2. Feeling- empathy Contexts of Moral Development 1. Social 2. Cultural
Image of page 4
Slide 5 Does your behavior match your moral reasoning? Do you think stealing is wrong?
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Slide 6 Resistance to Temptation and Self-Control Key ingredients of moral development from the social cognitive perspective (Bandura, 1986; Mischel, 1986) Self-control is influenced by cognitive factors (Mischel, 2004). Talking to oneself as a distracter Moral Behavior
Image of page 6
Slide 7 Moral Behavior Basic Processes: Based on Basic Learning Principles. Reinforcement, punishment, imitation, and the situation only parially account for moral behavior. Some children are more likely than others to cheat, lie, and steal regardless of situation or context. Social Cognitive Theory of Morality Distinguishes between moral competence (ability to produce moral behaviors), and moral performance (actually performing them) One does not always predict the other, but why?
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Slide 8 Moral Behavior Social Cognitive Theory (continued) Moral performance is determined by motivation and the rewards and incentives to act in a moral way. Bandura (1991, 2002, 2004) moral development is best understood by considering a combination of social and cognitive factors , especially those involving self control and self-regulation (not abstract reasoning)
Image of page 8
Slide 9 Percentage of children who observed the moral rule in the “honesty” situation under different circumstances
Image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Slide 10 Conclusions Moral judgment is important to moral action, but not always predictive When conditions require one to resist temptation (such as the no peeking task) , some element of social control and threat of punishment appear to be necessary for younger children (as well as adults!) Moral Behavior What methods are most effective for ensuring behavioral compliance?
Image of page 10
Slide 11
Image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern