lab4_plant structure

lab4_plant structure - Laboratory 4 Plant Structure: Dicots...

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Plant Structure: Dicots Laboratory 4
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70 L ABORATORY 4: P LANT S TRUCTURE INTRODUCTION This lab and the next (Lab 4), examine the general morphology, anatomy, and physiology of some typical angiosperms. You can help yourself learn this material by not limiting your observations to the laboratory. The next time you sit down to take a break between classes look around at the plants surrounding you. Ask yourself, Is this an angiosperm I’m looking at? If so, What kind is it, a monocot or a dicot? Is it a herbaceous plant or does it exhibit secondary growth? What kind of leaves does it have? Do these leaves show any obvious modifications? What kind of flowers does it possess? How does this plant reproduce? These are just a few of the questions you might ask. Asking questions this way will likely tell you two things: (1) plants CAN be interesting, and (2) there’s no such thing as a typical plant. A. Apical and Primary Meristems Within the germinating seeds you watched grow last week, there were two regions of rapid cell division. One region was located near the base of the plumule (shoot of germinating seedling) and is called the shoot apical meristem (Gk. merizein , to divide). The other region was located near the tip of the radicle and is called the root apical meristem. These two perpetually young meristems produce three types of primary meristems: protoderm, ground meristem, and procambium. These primary meristems are the first three specific tissues formed in the embryo. The term primary refers not to first, but to primary growth - the growth in length, as opposed to secondary growth , which is growth in girth. As the young OBJECTIVES OF THIS LAB Teaching Objectives 1. Review basic cellular structure of plants 2. What is the importance of meristems 3. How to differentiate between the different plant cell types, meristems, key structures in the root and stem arrangement 4. Assist students in finding key structures and elements of monocot and dicot roots and stems Student Learning Objectives (SLO) At the end of this lab, you should be able to: 1. Differentiate between primary and secondary growth 2. Identify the differences between monocot and dicot plants 3. Explain which tissues arise from the primary meristems 4. Examine the microscopic structure of a woody stem and locate the vascular system and vascular cambrium
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L ABORATORY 4: DICOTS 71 sporophyte continues to grow, these primary meristems divide, giving rise to even more specific tissues. However, before discussing specific plant tissue types, we will review the types of cells that make up these tissues. B. Common Plant Cell Types 1. Parenchyma A parenchyma cell is the kind of cell you probably envision when you think of a typical plant cell. It is a living, relatively undifferentiated cell with a nucleus, normal cytoplasm, and only primary (abbreviated as 1 o ) cell walls that are non-lignified. (Lignified
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This note was uploaded on 12/01/2009 for the course BIOL 172 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Hawaii.

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lab4_plant structure - Laboratory 4 Plant Structure: Dicots...

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