child1_ch18_12.7.outline

child1_ch18_12.7.outline - Slide 1 Infant and Child...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Slide 1 Infant and Child Development Chapter 18 Friday December 7, 2007
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Slide 2 Announcements Exam 3 on Tuesday Exam 4 (optional) Monday, Dec 17 th , 12-3pm, 135 Scott Hall Office hours next Thursday 10-12 Set up an appointment with the TA (Haruka Minami) if you want to review previous exams before taking exam 4
Background image of page 2
Slide 3 18—Culture Culture and Children’s Development Socioeconomic Status and Poverty Ethnicity Technology
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Slide 4 Culture and Children’s Development The Relevance of Culture to the Study of Children Culture The behavior, patterns, beliefs, and all other products of a particular group of people that are passed on from generation to generation.
Background image of page 4
Slide 5 Culture and Children’s Development The Relevance of Culture to the Study of Children (continued) Donald Campbell et al. (1976; 1968) note that people in all cultures tend to Believe that what happens in their culture is “natural” and “correct” and that what happens in other cultures is “unnatural ” and “incorrect ”; Perceive their customs as universally valid; Behave in ways that favor their cultural group; Feel hostile toward other cultural groups.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Slide 6 Culture and Children’s Development The Relevance of Culture to the Study of Children (continued) Ethnocentrism : Favoring one’s own group over other groups. Many assumptions in fields like psychology were developed in Western cultures, and consequently, the development of children in Western cultures evolved as the norm for all children. overgeneralization about the universal aspects of children were made based on data and experience in the middle-socioeconomic status culture of the U.S.
Background image of page 6
Slide 7 Culture and Children’s Development Cross-Cultural Comparisons (continued) Individualism and Collectivism Individualism gives priority to personal goals rather than to group goals; it emphasizes values that serve the self, such as feeling good, personal distinction and achievement, and independence. Collectivism e mphasizes values that serve the group by subordinating personal goals to preserve group integrity, interdependence of members, and harmonious relationships.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Slide 8 Culture and Children’s Development American and Chinese Self-Conceptions
Background image of page 8
Socioeconomic Status and Poverty What Is Socioeconomic Status? Socioeconomic status (SES): A grouping of people with similar occupational, educational, and economic characteristics. Socioeconomic Variations in Families, Neighborhoods, and Schools The families, schools, and neighborhoods of children have socioeconomic characteristics that can influence children’s adjustment and development. SES differences characterize family life and influence
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 34

child1_ch18_12.7.outline - Slide 1 Infant and Child...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online