EE0000_Notes - E.E. Foundation 1 SI UNITS 1.1 Important...

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E.E. Foundation
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1 1 SI U NITS 1.1 Important Quantities and Base SI Units Length metre m Mass, m kilogram kg Time, t second s Electric current, i ampere A Thermodynamic temperature kelvin K Plane angle radian rad
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2 Chapter 1 SI Units 1.2 Important Derived Quantities and SI Units Force, f f ma = newton Nk g m s 2 = Energy, e e fd mgh mu == = 2 2 joule JN m = Power, p p de dt = , = dt p e watt WJ s = Electric charge, q = dt i q , i dq dt = coulomb CA s = Electric potential, v v de dq de dt dt dq p i = p vi = , = dt vi e volt VJCWA Resistance, R v iR = , piR v R 2 2 ohm Ω= VA Inductance, L vL di dt = , e Li = 2 2 henry Η= Vs A Capacitance, C iC dv dt = , qC v = , e Cv = 2 2 farad FA sV = Magnetic flux, Φ vN d dt = weber Wb Vs = Magnetic flux density, Β B A = tesla TW bm 2 =
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Chapter 1 SI Units 3 1.3 Important Decimal Multiples and Sub-Multiples 10 12 tera T 10 9 giga G 10 6 mega M 10 3 kilo k 10 1 deci d 10 2 centi c 10 3 milli m 10 6 micro μ 10 9 nano n 10 12 pico p 10 15 femto f 1.4 References [1] ISO Standard 31 (13 parts), International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO). [2] Symbols and Abbreviations for use in Electrical and Electronic Engineering Courses, Institution of Electrical Engineers, London.
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4 2 DC C IRCUIT A NALYSIS 2.1 Voltage Source Two common dc (direct current) voltage sources are: Dry battery (AA, D, C, etc.) 15 .V Lead acid battery in car 12 V Regardless of the load connected and the current drawn, the above sources have the characteristic that the supply voltage will not change very much. The definition for an ideal voltage source is thus one whose output voltage does not depend on what has been connected to it. The circuit symbol is
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Chapter 2 DC Circuit Analysis 5 v Basically, the arrow and the value v signifies that the top terminal has a potential of v with respect to the bottom terminal regardless of what has been connected and the current being drawn. Note that the current being drawn is not defined but depends on the load connected. For example, a battery (which approximates an ideal voltage source) will give no current if nothing is connected to it, but may be supplying a lot of current if a powerful motor is connected across its terminals. However, in both cases, the terminal voltages will be roughly the same. Using the above and other common circuit symbol, the following sources are identical: 1.5 V 1.5 V 1.5 V + 1.5 V + Note that on its own, the arrow does not correspond to the positive terminal. Instead, the positive terminal depends on both the arrow and the sign of the voltage v which may be negative.
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6 Chapter 2 DC Circuit Analysis 2.2 Current Source In the same way that the output voltage of an ideal voltage source does not depend on the load and the current drawn, the current delivers by an ideal current source does not depend on what has been connected and the voltage across its terminals.
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EE0000_Notes - E.E. Foundation 1 SI UNITS 1.1 Important...

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