child1_ch12_11.2_outline

child1_ch12_11.2_outline - Slide 1 Infant and Child...

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Slide 1 Infant and Child Development Chapter 12-13 Friday November 2, 2007
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Slide 2 Announcements Drafts for Paper #2 accepted until Nov 19th
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Slide 3 12—The Self and Identity Self-Understanding Self-Concept Self-Esteem
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Slide 4 Self-esteem = The evaluative part of self-concept Judgment of overall worth Reflects perceptions that do not always match reality In early childhood tends to be either: n I am good Or n I am bad Self-Esteem
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Slide 5 Self-Esteem Evaluating Self-Esteem Not an easy task!
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Slide 6 Early contributions Early contributions IWMs - securely attached children tend to have a more positive sense of self than insecurely attached children Parenting styles - warm supportive parents who set clear standards and listen to child’s concerns fosters higher self-esteem Self-Esteem
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Slide 7 Middle childhood Middle childhood Evaluate competencies in different areas and integrate them into an overall self-evaluation. (i.e. social acceptance, task/academic competence, physical/athletic competence, behavioral conduct) Social comparison helps define competencies Self-knowledge and self-esteem depend on how others perceive and react to our behavior (Cooley’s looking-glass self) Self-Esteem
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Slide 8 Harter’s research: Early childhood (4-7): social acceptance (how well others like them) Middle childhood (8-12) : physical, academic, and social domains; incorporate other's evaluations Late childhood/Early adolescence : perceptions of self- worth increasingly differentiated and more centered on interpersonal relationships (romantic appeal, quality of close friendships) In general, children differ in the importance they attach to different competencies. If they are good at what they value, they have high self-worth. . Self-Esteem
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Slide 9 Self-Esteem Correlations between Global Self-Esteem and Self-Evaluations of Domains of Competence Self-esteem has a strong tie with self-perception in the domain of physical appearance across the life span, cross-culturally.
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Variability in Self-Esteem Self-esteem is fairly stable across development slight dip upon entering middle school, but most show modest increase across adolescence Adjustment over time can depend on the number of stressors and supportive parenting School performance is only moderately correlated with S-E, and efforts to increase students’ S-E do not always lead to improved school performance. High correlations between self-esteem and happiness Low self-esteem is linked to depression, suicide attempts, and anorexia nervosa. Self-Esteem
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child1_ch12_11.2_outline - Slide 1 Infant and Child...

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