Ethics - Research Methods Dr. Ken Rice Department of...

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Research Methods Dr. Ken Rice Department of Psychology Ethics and Research Principles, codes, expectations Institutional Review Boards Application Judging Ethics Men are recruited to participate in an experiment on sexual attitudes. .. VERY ETHICAL 1 2 3 4 5 VERY UN ETHICAL Judging Ethics Inexperienced soldiers, unaware that they are actually involved in a research study of the effects of combat stress, are disoriented, isolated, given false instructions… VERY ETHICAL 1 2 3 4 5 VERY UN ETHICAL Why do we care about ethics? History – some Examples Tuskegee syphilis research (1932—1972!) WWII and Nazi experimentation (1939-1945) Willowbrook Hospital – MR, hepatitis (1963-1966) Milgram obedience research (1960-1963) Nuremberg Code after WWII humans must not be participants in research projects unless they are fully informed of the proposed procedures and voluntarily consent to the procedures Why do we care about ethics? Surgeon General regulations all research sponsored by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (now Dept. of Health and Human Services) National Research Act (1974) apply to all research involving human participants conducted at institutions receiving Federal $ Institutional Review Boards
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Ethical Standards APA Ethics Code (Read General Principles and Section 8.0) All psychologists (including students) must follow the APA guides for ethical behavior. The five general values or principles for ethical conduct are • Beneficence and Nonmaleficence • Fidelity and Responsibility • Integrity • Justice • Respect for People’s Rights and Dignity Ethical Issues to Consider Prior to conducting any study , the proposed research must be reviewed to determine if it meets ethical standards. • Researcher designs study, evaluates various ethical issues, and writes protocol for review • Institutional Review Board (IRB) • Committee of university and community representatives • Charged with protection of research participants • Reviews protocols • Works with PI to resolve concerns • Investigates problems, suspends approval, periodic re-approval evaluations Risk/Benefit Ratio The risk/benefit ratio is a subjective evaluation of the costs and benefits of a research project to: participants society the researcher and institution Is the research worth it? Are the benefits greater than the risks? Will the study produce valid and interpretable results? Risks in Research Different types of risk: • physical and psychological (e.g., embarrassment, self-esteem, stress) Researchers are ethically obligated to protect participants • from emotional or mental stress • including stress that might arise from participants’ misconceptions about the research
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> Minimal Risk Minimal risk means that the harm or discomfort participants may experience is not greater than what they might experience in their daily lives or during routine physical or psychological
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This note was uploaded on 12/02/2009 for the course PPE 4412 taught by Professor Rice during the Spring '09 term at University of Florida.

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Ethics - Research Methods Dr. Ken Rice Department of...

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