CHAPTER 49 BEHAVIOR - PowerLecture: Chapter 49 Behavioral...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–17. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
PowerLecture: Chapter 49 Behavioral Ecology
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Animal Behavior Observable coordinated responses to stimuli Originates with genes that direct the formation of tissues and organs of the animal body
Background image of page 2
FOUNDATIONS FOR BEHAVIOR An individuals behavior starts with interactions among gene products, such as hormones and pheromones. Most behavior has innate components but can be modified by environmental factors . Behavior traits that have a heritable basis and that enhance the individual’s survival and reproductive success can evolve by natural selection.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Genes and Behavior Some variations in behavior have a genetic basis Arnold showed that garter snakes’ taste for slugs has genetic basis Hybrid snakes showed behavior intermediate between parental types
Background image of page 4
THE BANANA SLUG IS THE FOOD OF CHOICE FOR COASTAL GARTER SNAKES. INLAND BORN GARTER SNAKES PREFER TADPOLES AND FISH. Fig. 49-2a, p.900
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Coastal snakes eat slugs Fig. 49-2b, p.900
Background image of page 6
NEWBORN COASTAL SNAKES SHOW INTEREST IN COTTON SOAKED WITH SLUG JUICE. INLAND SNAKES IGNORE THE SLUG SMELL. THE PREFERENCE APPEARS TO BE INSTINCTIVE OR INBORN Fig. 49-2c, p.900
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Instinctive Behavior Performed without having been learned Usually triggered by simple sign stimuli Response is a stereotyped motor program, a fixed-action pattern
Background image of page 8
SOME EXAMPLES OF INSTINCTIVE OR INNATE BEHAVIOR Garter snake food preference Fruit fly courtship The monogamous vole (dependent on production of the hormone oxytocin) The Cuckoo bird hatchlings taking over the nest. Mimicry of facial expressions in the human infant.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fig. 49-3a, p.900
Background image of page 10
Fig. 49-4a, p.901
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fig. 49-5, p.901
Background image of page 12
SOME DEFINITIONS REPRODUCTIVE SUCCESS: An individual reproduces and at least some offspring survive. ADAPTIVE BEHAVIOR: A form of behavior that helps to perpetuate the individual’s genes. Its frequency in a population will be maintained or increase over time. SOCIAL BEHAVIOR: Behavior expressed in the context of interactions of individuals of the same species. SELFISH BEHAVIOR: Form of behavior that improves an individual’s chance to produce or protect its own offspring regardless of the impact on the population. ALTRUISM: Self-sacrificing behavior. An individual behaves in a way that helps others in a population but reduces its own chance of producing offspring.
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Selection for Behavior Some variation in behavior has a genetic basis Some behavior promotes reproductive success (is adaptive) Genes that encode adaptive behavior will increase in population
Background image of page 14
Adaptive Behavior Behavior that promotes propagation of an individual’s genes Its frequency will be maintained or increase in successive generations
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fig. 49-8a, p.903
Background image of page 16
Image of page 17
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 12/02/2009 for the course SCI 013 taught by Professor Xxx during the Fall '09 term at Purdue University Calumet.

Page1 / 67

CHAPTER 49 BEHAVIOR - PowerLecture: Chapter 49 Behavioral...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 17. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online