GEB3031 Exam 2 Notes

GEB3031 Exam 2 Notes - 1 GEB 3031 Exam 2 Notes Fear of...

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GEB 3031 Exam 2 Notes Fear of conflict Blaming others for problems Belief that others can’t/won’t change Belief that problems will “blow over” Important because negative interactions detract from teamwork, communication, creativity, and leadership Different positions Different interests Different perceptions (information) Different styles (e.g., aggressive) Different perspectives or backgrounds (i.e., intellectual diversity) Ask whether you are the problem Take the ARSE test Examine motives Venting vs. problem solving Determine importance of relationship Important (high interdependence) Not so important (loosely coupled) Consider potential for improvement Share your impressions of what’s going on Share information, attributions, assumptions Acknowledge your contribution to problem Open discussion creates a context for integrative (win-win) negotiations that (creatively?) address each party’s interests Burying feelings 1
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Being analytical and detached Striking back “Lashing out” Avoiding conflict Changing the subject Self-awareness of self-image Accept imperfections Adopt “both/and” rather than “either/or” mindset Frame the problem productively Emphasize legitimacy of differences Express feelings, not accusations Emphasize common/aligned interests Listen and share openly (collaborate) Develop tangible action plans Ethical situations can be viewed as quandaries to be resolved Choice typically not between right and wrong, but rather is among two or more “rights” Should a large apartment complex be approved when local schools are already overcrowded? Should gambling be legalized, and should we use lotteries to fund education? Should banks receiving government bailout funds be allowed to offer executive bonuses? Should businesses provide health benefits to employees? 2
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Your decisions affect other people’s lives and well-being Managers must distribute resources fairly Managers design and implement rules and policies Managerial decisions often test personal values Any issue that implies significant harm or benefit to others may be described as “ethical” This is true even if an ethical response to a situation isn’t clear There are two complementary views on ethics Utilitarianism Formalism Using both requires “Janusian thinking”: The ability to consider multiple perspectives simultaneously Decisions should achieve the greatest good for the greatest number Commonly utilizes cost-benefit analysis Problems May not be just – some may be treated poorly Emphasizes quantifiable criteria Criteria (costs and benefits) may be manipulated or reframed to support preferred solutions Emphasizes universal moral principles rather than personal wants and desires
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GEB3031 Exam 2 Notes - 1 GEB 3031 Exam 2 Notes Fear of...

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