CHAPTER TWELVE - CHAPTER TWELVE (See also pages 34-36 for...

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CHAPTER TWELVE (See also pages 34-36 for additional information on the United Sates court system—especially on the issues of jurisdiction and judicial review.) 1. What are the objectives of Chapter 12 as stated in the text? Explaining what judges do, discerning the SC’s place in American government, exploring how the Court decides cases. 2. What three factors distinguish the Supreme Court and other courts from the rest of the national government? Judiciary operates only in the context of cases, cases develop in a strictly prescribed fashion, judges rely heavily on reason in justifying what they do. 3. Unlike other parts of the national government the courts do not initiate actions or make policy. They have to wait until cases are brought to them in order to act? What is a “case”? It is a controversy to be decided by a court. 4. What is the difference between a civil case and a criminal case? Criminal cases result when the gov’t begins legal action against someone following commission of a crime. Civil cases encompass all non-criminal legal actions and commonly include attempts to redress a private wrong or to settle a private dispute. 5. Why do we say we have 51 judicial systems in the United States? There are 50 courts, one in each state, and then the Supreme Court.
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CHAPTER TWELVE - CHAPTER TWELVE (See also pages 34-36 for...

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