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hamlet II.ii.530-585 - K r istin K illmeyer Int ro to...

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Kristin Killmeyer Intro to Critical Reading Whitney 10-6-09 Analysis of Hamlet : Act 2, Scene 2, Lines 530-85 Shakespeare’s Hamlet includes many soliloquies. There is nothing more dramatic in a play than one man (or woman) speaking to himself or to the audience about his truest inner feelings, wishes, or desires. In the very end of Act 2 Scene 2 of this play, Hamlet is seen talking to himself (his second soliloquy) about the plot of his Uncle Claudius’ death, among other things. He has just asked an actor to perform a piece for tomorrow night that includes a murder, so that his uncle might see it. During his soliloquy, Hamlet discloses that his intentions are to make Claudius reveal his guilt by watching the same crime he had committed. All the while, however, Hamlet berates himself for not having the courage to go forth with his revenge. This soliloquy is full of contradictions in what Hamlet says. In the beginning of the soliloquy, Hamlet curses himself for not being as passionate as the actor he has just seen. He does not think it’s fair that a man with no incentive for emotion can gather up the passion and feeling and portray an emotional role, while Hamlet is just a “dull and muddy-mettled rascal…” (line 543). Hamlet compares himself to the actor, saying that if the actor had the motivation for emotion as Hamlet did, he would “drown the stage with tears” (line 538) and make the audience go insane. His comparison
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