Lecture 1 - History 7A, Lecture #1 History 7A, Lecture #1...

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Unformatted text preview: History 7A, Lecture #1 History 7A, Lecture #1 Imagining Worlds, Old and New I. Radical Contingency in History I. Radical Contingency in History A. Is the Past Necessary? B. The Inevitability of America? C. You Mean, Everything I Think I Know Might Be Wrong . . . ? “Daniel Boone Escorting Settlers through the Cumberland Gap,” George Caleb Bingham, 1851­52 “Westward the Course of Empire Takes its Way,” Emmanuel Leutze, 1861 “Across the Continent,” Currier and Ives, 1868 “Manifest Destiny,” John Gast, 1872 “The Peaceable Kingdom,” Edward Hicks, 1834 II. The Myth of Continents and II. The Myth of Continents and Other Mental Conventions A. Conventions of Geography and the Essentialist Problem Ptolemaic World Map, 1467 Ptolemaic World Map, 1467 Martin Waldseemuller Map, Martin Waldseemuller Map, 1507 North America, Conventional Views North America, Conventional Views The Atlantic World, The Atlantic World, Unconventional Views II. The Myth of Continents and II. The Myth of Continents and Other Mental Conventions B. Conventions of Chronology, or, Early for What? Mississippian Society ­­ Cahokia Mississippian Society ­­ Cahokia Mississippian Society: Mississippian Society: Artist’s Rendering Aztec Society: Tenochtitlan Aztec Society: Tenochtitlan “The Conquest of Tenochtitlan,” Late 17th Century III. Europe in the Late Middle Ages: III. Europe in the Late Middle Ages: Social System and World View A. The Great Chain of Being III. Europe in the Late Middle Ages: III. Europe in the Late Middle Ages: Social System and World View B. Localism: Ties to the Land III. Europe in the Late Middle Ages: III. Europe in the Late Middle Ages: Social System and World View C. Religion Mirrors the Social Order IV. Sources for European Expansion IV. Sources for European Expansion and Challenges to Tradition A. Population Growth and Economic Development IV. Sources for European Expansion IV. Sources for European Expansion and Challenges to Tradition: B. Consolidation of European Kingdoms IV. Sources for European Expansion IV. Sources for European Expansion and Challenges to Tradition C. Cultural Change: The Renaissance V. Dreams of a New World: V. Dreams of a New World: Breaking the Great Chain A. New World Wealth as a Source of Power V. Dreams of a New World: V. Dreams of a New World: Breaking the Great Chain B. Religion: Reformation Challenge to the Traditional Church V. Dreams of a New World: V. Dreams of a New World: Breaking the Great Chain C. Utopian Visions V. Dreams of a New World: V. Dreams of a New World: Breaking the Great Chain D. The Dark Side of New World Dreams ...
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This note was uploaded on 12/03/2009 for the course HISTORY 7a taught by Professor Einhorn during the Fall '08 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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