2-16-07 AlertingAndResponseBottleneckHO

2-16-07 AlertingAndResponseBottleneckHO - Attention...

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    Attention (Continued) Alerting Response Bottleneck  February 16, 2007
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    Severe Neglect: Anosognosia Patients with left side neglect usually suffer  from  anosognosia , a denial of illness.   They claim that they can see and move about in  the world perfectly normally. This symptom can be temporarily alleviated  by pouring cold water in the left ear (Bisiach). An  alerting  attentional response (next topic). Left vestibular sense has strong connections to  right hemisphere. Cold water forces attention to the right  hemisphere.
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    Alerting: Unattended Input Failure to direct attention to critical  unattended input could lead to a disaster. So  attention not completely under voluntary  control. The three ways alerting takes place: Reflex arc. Conditioning result of novelty detection  according to Rescorla-Wagner model. Habituation of perceptual receptors causes a  novel stimulus to elicit a strong response (Groves  Failure of selection because the distracter is  similar to the target
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    Alerting and Task Difficulty Alerting depends on: The strength of the alerting stimulus. Novel stimuli have greater strength than habituated  stimuli. Task difficulty as a function of the demand on  working memory: Zelniker (1971): Delayed auditory feedback study. Immediate shadowing (easy) versus delayed shadowing  (difficult):  8 9 6 7 4 9. .. More stuttering with easy task (less inhibition of  unattended input).
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    Arousal Arousal influences the ability to focus and maintain attention, hence arousal influences task performance (Yerkes-Dodson Law) Low High Easy Task Difficult Task Arousal Task Performance
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    Easterbrook’s Hypothesis Task performance usually requires attending  to a limited number of inputs (targets) and  inhibiting others (distracters). Arousal has its positive effect on task 
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2008 for the course PSYCH 340 taught by Professor Ackroff during the Spring '07 term at Rutgers.

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2-16-07 AlertingAndResponseBottleneckHO - Attention...

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