Discussion and conclusion 11- aldol reaction

Discussion and - Discussion and conclusion-Preparation of trans-p-anisalacetophenone 1 Aldol condensation is a reaction between a carbonyl compound

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Discussion and conclusion-Preparation of trans-p-anisalacetophenone 1. Aldol condensation is a reaction between a carbonyl compound reacts with an enolate ion and the product is a beta-hyroxyketone or a beta-hydroxyaldehyde. The reaction gives a conjugated enone when it is dehydrated. The most important feature about aldol condentations is the face that the reaction makes or forms a new carbon carbon bond. The reaction mechanism is that of a ketone enolate nucleophillically adding to an aldehyde and the result being a (an alcohol plus a n aldehyde or aldol) beta-hydroketone . The mechanism of the reaction is as follows. a. The first and most important part of the reaction is the reaction of the aldol, which is one of the most powerful ways of forming a new carbon- carbon bond in chemistry and the second part of the aldol condensation is the elimination reaction. The union of two simple molecules into is the feature of the reaction that makes it so powerful. A typical aldol reaction might involve the addition of an Nucleophilic addition of an aldehyde to a ketone. In aldol reaction there are many candidates for the nucleophile.
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2009 for the course CHE 210 taught by Professor Swinnea during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Discussion and - Discussion and conclusion-Preparation of trans-p-anisalacetophenone 1 Aldol condensation is a reaction between a carbonyl compound

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