CS175Law part 1

CS175Law part 1 - Policy and Law: The US Constitution...

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Policy and Law: The US Constitution Prof. Dianne Martin CS 175
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Law of Code -Lessig Regulatory Mechanisms     Laws Constitution – allocation of powers Legal system, regulations   Norms - policies, ethics codes   Market Forces - practices “Code” - protocols, standards,  actual controls
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Historical Basis of US Constitution Magna Carta 1215 –no man (king!) is above the  law; established the rights of freemen No freeman shall be taken, imprisoned,. ..or in any  other way destroyed. ..except by the lawful judgment  of his peers, or by the law of the land. To no one will  we sell, to none will we deny or delay, right or justice.   Virginia Declaration of Rights -June 12, 1776 Declaration of Independence - July 4, 1776 Articles of Confederation, 1781 US Constitution – 1787 completed; 1789 in effect Bill of Rights – first 10 amendments, 1791
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Virginia Declaration of Rights - June 12, 1776 I     That all men are by nature equally free and independent, and have certain inherent rights, of which, when  they enter into a state of society, they cannot, by any compact, deprive or divest their posterity; namely, the  enjoyment of life and liberty, with the means of acquiring and possessing property, and pursuing and  obtaining happiness and safety.  II   That all power is vested in, and consequently derived from, the people; that magistrates are their trustees and  servants, and at all times amenable to them.  III That government is, or ought to be, instituted for the common benefit, protection, and security of the people,  nation or community; of all the various modes and forms of government that is best, which is capable of  producing the greatest degree of happiness and safety and is most effectually secured against the danger of  maladministration; and that, whenever any government shall be found inadequate or contrary to these  purposes, a majority of the community hath an indubitable, unalienable, and indefeasible right to reform,  alter or abolish it, in such manner as shall be judged most conducive to the public weal.  IV That no man, or set of men, are entitled to exclusive or separate emoluments or privileges from the  community, but in consideration of public services; which, not being descendible, neither ought the offices of  magistrate, legislator, or judge be hereditary.  V That the legislative and executive powers of the state should be separate and distinct from the judicative; and,  that the members of the two first may be restrained from oppression by feeling and participating the  burthens of the people, they should, at fixed periods, be reduced to a private station, return into that body 
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This note was uploaded on 12/04/2009 for the course CS 175 taught by Professor C.martin during the Fall '09 term at GWU.

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CS175Law part 1 - Policy and Law: The US Constitution...

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