CS175ContentControl

CS175ContentControl - Free Speech and Content Control on...

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Unformatted text preview: Free Speech and Content Control on the Internet CS 175 Issues to Consider Raw power of the Internet History of free speech Free speech versus regulation Role of W3C in content control PICS and content control Internet was constructed, not a naturally evolving entity (Lessig) Power to Access Millions Computational power Communication power Freedom of expression Connectivity power Freedom to form affinity groups Power to deceive and defraud Balance of power versus rights versus the common good Free Speech Defined [wikepedia] The right to seek information and ideas The right to receive information and ideas The right to impart information and ideas The right to disagree! [without fear] Liberty to express opinions and ideas without hindrance, and especially without fear of punishment. Despite the constitutional guarantee of free speech in the United States, legal systems have not treated freedom of speech as absolute. Among the more obvious restrictions on the freedom to say just what one likes where one likes are laws regulating incitement, sedition, defamation, slander and libel, blasphemy, the expression of racial hatred, and conspiracy. The liberal tradition has generally defended freedom of the sort of speech which does not violate others' rights or lead to predictable and avoidable harm, but it has been fierce in that defence because a free interchange of ideas is seen as an essential ingredient of democracy and resistance to tyranny, and as an important agent of improvement. History of Free Speech Restrictions on freedom of speech date back to 1275 in England De Scandalis Magnatum established the Star Chamber with authority without a warrant or other legal proceeding to imprison nobles for spreading stories about the king to weaken the loyalty of subjects. This continued with the printing press [legal or administrative bodies with strict, arbitrary rulings and secretive proceedings are sometimes called, metaphorically or poetically, star chambers . This is a pejorative term and intended to cast doubt on the legitimacy of the proceedings] More on History of Free Speech Gutenberg's invention of moveable type in 1440 suddenly made it possible to disseminate printed information in a relatively quick and inexpensive fashion among a large and geographically disparate body of readers. The power of the press was immediately evident to those who were accustomed to wielding power by granting privilege or punishment. By 1585 the Star Chamber required a license before anything could be printed. Star Chamber Decree...
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CS175ContentControl - Free Speech and Content Control on...

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