GeorgiaTech_Cisco_TeachingLab

GeorgiaTech_Cisco_TeachingLab - Georgia Tech Hands On...

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1 Georgia Tech “Hands On” Network Security Laboratory Randal T. Abler, Didier Contis, Julian Grizzard, and Henry L. Owen* School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 USA *Corresponding Author: Henry Owen School of Electrical and Computer Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0250 USA Email: [email protected] Phone: 404-894-4126 Fax: 404-894-9959 Abstract An undergraduate internetwork security-teaching laboratory, which includes both defensive and offensive security laboratory experimentation, is described. This laboratory is oriented toward an introductory internetworking security class for students that have already had an introductory internetworking class. This laboratory is intended to complement more theoretical network security classes and to spark student interest in taking more network security classes. The laboratory is unique in that it uses an isolated laboratory network that attempts to represent the Internet as closely as possible by including a corporate network component, a university component, a “good” Internet service provider, and a “bad” Internet service provider. The use of virtual networking technology allows the physical network topology to be electronically reconfigured into different logical topologies. All of the laboratory assignments are available on the Internet for general community use and modification.
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2 I Introduction In order to complement the numerous theoretical security classes that exist, we determined the need for a “hands on” oriented laboratory based class that allows students to be exposed to the real world challenges of network security. A common complaint from students who have taken theoretical network security classes was that there did not appear to be any way to legally and ethically obtain practical experience with network security. After a search for textbook or online “hands on” network security laboratory materials, we realized that there did not appear to be an existing set of self contained materials that we could utilize to meet a “hands on” type learning experience. Thus, we set out to create this laboratory and the associated laboratory materials. The goals of this network security laboratory include exposing students to both defensive mechanisms as well as offensive mechanisms used by the opposition. We do this so that a better understanding of why things are happening in the network security arena may be gained. The laboratory was not intended to just be a “hacker festival” so that students could learn hacking techniques; instead, the intent was to allow both defensive and offensive strategies to be understood and explored. We believe that better protection mechanisms and strategies may be created and employed when there is a full understanding of how attacks are created and how they work. This laboratory is intended to spark student interest in network security so that more traditional theoretical network
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This note was uploaded on 12/05/2009 for the course IT IS taught by Professor Arther during the Three '09 term at Queensland Tech.

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GeorgiaTech_Cisco_TeachingLab - Georgia Tech Hands On...

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