CC1024D-10M-Unit6 - Robert Kerin CC1024D-10M Unit 6...

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Robert Kerin CC1024D-10M Unit 6 10/2/2009 Explain the four ways states allow juveniles to be tried as adults in the criminal courts?” Some juveniles may be waived, or transferred, into adult court. In this procedure the juvenile court relinquishes its jurisdiction over the juvenile. Waiver is usually reserved for juveniles over a certain age (varying from 13 to 15) who are accused of violent or other serious crimes. On the federal level, for example, a juvenile accused of committing a violent crime that is a felony may be tried in adult federal court. Waiver in federal court is also authorized for a juvenile accused of violating federal firearms laws or laws prohibiting the sale of controlled substances (18 U.S.C.A. § 5032 [2000]). The decision of whether to relinquish jurisdiction is usually made by the juvenile court. However, most jurisdictions have statutes that automatically exclude from juvenile court juveniles charged with violent or other serious crimes. In such cases an adult court prosecutor is
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CC1024D-10M-Unit6 - Robert Kerin CC1024D-10M Unit 6...

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