Motor_Rythm

Motor_Rythm - What you will learn in these lectures. 1. In...

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Unformatted text preview: What you will learn in these lectures. 1. In these lectures, we will move beyond simple circuits and study motor systems controlling the behavior of invertebrates, and study the swimming behavior of the Tritonia sea slug and the escape response of a crayfish. 2. In Tritonia, we will introduce a rhythmically oscillating swimming circuit 3. In Tritonia, we will see it is possible for a circuit to rhythmically oscillate independent of sensory feedback. A circuit exhibiting this behavior is referred to as a central pattern generator (CPG). 4. In Tritonia, we will re-emphasize the importance of connectivity, synaptic properties, and intrinsic cellular properties in producing the coordinated swimming pattern. Altering any of these variables may lead to a novel swimming behavior potentially beneficial or disastrous to the organism. 5. In Tritonia, we will see that although the CPG can oscillate independent of sensory feedback, in reality, swimming is constantly being shaped by the behavioral stateof the animal and external stimuli. You will learn via a series of computer simulations that the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the Tritonia swimming circuit can be modulated by a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic influences. 6. In studying the crayfish escape response, we will be introduced to a type of synapse referred to as an electrical synapse. 7. In studying the crayfish escape response, we will see that the main advantage of an electrical synapse is speed. We will also see that electrical synapses have their disadvantages in comparison to chemical synapses. 8. In studying crayfish, you will see that there is a fast and a slow pathway leading to and sustaining the escape response. 9.In the crayfish escape response, you will learn the effect of massive inhibitory pathways stemming from the lateral giant neuron. These pathways serve the following functions: 1) make sure only one possible reflex circuit is operating, 2) inhibit antagonist muscles, 3) turn off sensory stimulation that would occur from swimming, and 4) ultimately end the flexion....
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This note was uploaded on 12/06/2009 for the course NPB 100 taught by Professor Chapman during the Fall '08 term at UC Davis.

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Motor_Rythm - What you will learn in these lectures. 1. In...

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