Lecture 7 - Lecture 7: Jan. 18 Species Interactions:...

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Lecture 7: Jan. 18 Species Interactions: ¾ ¾ Consequences of Predation ± Are Predators Efficient Enough to Reduce Prey Populations? ± Why Don’t Herbivores Eat Everything - Why Is the World Green? ± How Do Prey Defend Themselves? - constitutive & ± Coevolution and Arms Races Discussion Activity Next Week ‘Indirect Effects’ article - read article before you come to discussion (week 4) Check Qwizdom Points on SAMS https://cats.lsa.umich.edu/ Reading: Chs. 53 :1220- 25; 39 :904-7 Biology in the News competition -- amensalism 0 - parasitism predation herbivory + - harmful amensalism 0 - 0 0 commensalism + 0 neutral parasitism predation herbivory + - commensalism + 0 mutualism + + beneficial harmful neutral beneficial Effect of B on A Types of interactions between two species – a continuum Effect of species A on species B Predation & Herbivory - defined as + - interaction Predator benefits by killing the prey and consuming the prey or some of the prey’s tissues; the prey dies. Herbivores usually consume some of the plants’ tissues and often do not kill the plant; occasionally herbivores can kill their prey. In both cases the consumer’s fitness increases and the prey’s decreases. Predation is widespread and easy to observe. Neither its
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Lecture 7 - Lecture 7: Jan. 18 Species Interactions:...

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