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Lecture 4 - Cell Theory Cellular Structure and Function...

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Cell Theory Cellular Structure and Function Understand the differences between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell Be able to explain the function of the organelles found in the eukaryotic cell. Know the components of the cytoskeleton and how those components function in the eukaryotic cell.
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Cell Theory Observed and described the structure of plant and animal cells Conclusions… Matthias Schleiden Theodor Schwann 1839
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Cell Theory All known living things are made up of cells. The cell is the structural and functional unit of all living things. All cells come from pre-existing cells by division (no spontaneous generation!).
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Cell Theory Cells contain hereditary information that is passed from cell to cell during cell division. All cells are basically the same in chemical composition. All energy flow (metabolism) of life occurs within cells.
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Cell Theory Unicellular – most life on the planet Protists Bacteria Yeast Algae
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Cell Theory Multicellular – plants and animals
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Cell Theory Tissues Organs Organ System Organism
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Tissues
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Three Domain System Carl Woese – 1990 Kingdom Monera: Eubacteria and Archaebacteria Archaea: 1. Generally live in extreme environments 2. Differences in ribosomal RNA (rRNA) from eubacteria 3. Share some features with Eukaryotes
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Three Domain System Carl Woese – 1990
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Viruses Technically, they are not alive! Very specific about species they infect and cells in which they can reproduce Phage: virus that infects bacteria
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Acellular Agents Viroids small, circular RNA molecules (lack capsid) plant diseases (stunt growth) Potato Spindle Tuber Viroid Uninfected
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Acellular Agents Prions infectious protein (no nucleic acid) Prion form converts normal protein to prion Diseases – spongiform encephalopathies
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Phospholipids
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Phospholipids and Cell Membranes Amphipathic!
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Fluid Mosaic Model Selective permeability!
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Fluid Mosaic Model
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Membrane Proteins
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Membrane Proteins
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